Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Space Industry and Business News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



CHIP TECH
Optical Chip Enables New Approach To Quantum Computing

This is the photonic chip next to a UK penny. The chip contains micrometer and sub-micrometer features and guide light using a network of waveguides. The output of this network can be seen on the surface of the chip. Credit: Photograph by Jasmin Meinecke
by Staff Writers
Bristol, UK (SPX) Sep 23, 2010
An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bristol has developed a new approach to quantum computing that could soon be used to perform complex calculations that cannot be done by today's computers.

Scientists from Bristol's Centre for Quantum Photonics have developed a silicon chip that could be used to perform complex calculations and simulations using quantum particles in the near future.

The researchers believe that their device represents a new route to a quantum computer - a powerful type of computer that uses quantum bits (qubits) rather than the conventional bits used in today's computers.

Unlike conventional bits or transistors, which can be in one of only two states at any one time (1 or 0), a qubit can be in several states at the same time and can therefore be used to hold and process a much larger amount of information at a greater rate.

"It is widely believed that a quantum computer will not become a reality for at least another 25 years," says Professor Jeremy O'Brien, Director of the Centre for Quantum Photonics. "However, we believe, using our new technique, a quantum computer could, in less than ten years, be performing calculations that are outside the capabilities of conventional computers."

The technique developed in Bristol uses two identical particles of light (photons) moving along a network of circuits in a silicon chip to perform an experiment known as a quantum walk. Quantum walk experiments using one photon have been done before and can even be modelled exactly by classical wave physics.

However, this is the first time a quantum walk has been performed with two particles and the implications are far-reaching.

"Using a two-photon system, we can perform calculations that are exponentially more complex than before," says Prof O'Brien. "This is very much the beginning of a new field in quantum information science and will pave the way to quantum computers that will help us understand the most complex scientific problems."

In the short term, the team expect to apply their new results immediately for developing new simulation tools in their own lab. In the longer term, a quantum computer based on a multi-photon quantum walk could be used to simulate processes which themselves are governed by quantum mechanics, such as superconductivity and photosynthesis.

"Our technique could improve our understanding of such important processes and help, for example, in the development of more efficient solar cells," adds Prof O'Brien. Other applications include the development of ultra-fast and efficient search engines, designing high-tech materials and new pharmaceuticals.

The leap from using one photon to two photons is not trivial because the two particles need to be identical in every way and because of the way these particles interfere, or interact, with each other. There is no direct analogue of this interaction outside of quantum physics.

"Now that we can directly realize and observe two-photon quantum walks, the move to a three-photon, or multi-photon, device is relatively straightforward, but the results will be just as exciting" says Prof O'Brien.

"Each time we add a photon, the complexity of the problem we are able to solve increases exponentially, so if a one-photon quantum walk has 10 outcomes, a two-photon system can give 100 outcomes and a three-photon system 1000 solutions and so on."

The group, which includes researchers from Tohoku University, Japan, the Weizmann Institute in Israel and the University of Twente in the Netherlands, now plans to use the chip to perform quantum mechanical simulations. The researchers are also planning to increase the complexity of their experiment not only by adding more photons but also by using larger circuits.



Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
University of Bristol
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


CHIP TECH
Spin Soliton Could Be A Hit In Cell Phone Communication
Washington DC (SPX) Sep 17, 2010
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have found theoretical evidence of a new way to generate the high-frequency waves used in modern communication devices such as cell phones. Their analysis, if supported by experimental evidence, could contribute to a new generation of wireless technology that would be more secure and resistant to interference than con ... read more







CHIP TECH
Gates tops list of richest Americans, Zuckerberg 35th

FCC frees up spectrum for super-fast wireless

Newspaper publishers want control over iPad subscriptions

Thales Alenia Space To Supply Components For Russian Satellites

CHIP TECH
Modern infrastructures said 'vulnerable'

MEADS Completes CDR And Is Ready For Flight Test

Airborne Multi-Intelligence Lab Demonstrates Intelligence Integration

Boeing Vigilare Enters Service With RAAF

CHIP TECH
LockMart And ATK Athena Launch Vehicles Selected As A NASA Launch Services Provider

Sirius XM-5 Satellite Delivered To Baikonur For October Launch

Emerging Technologies May Fuel Revolutionary Launcher

EUMETSAT Chooses Arianespace To Launch Metop-C

CHIP TECH
E-Shirt Improves Physical Exercise

Cuba May Link Up To Glonass System

Japan launches satellite for better GPS coverage

Taking The 'Search' Out Of Search And Rescue

CHIP TECH
Human-Powered Ornithopter Becomes First Ever To Achieve Sustained Flight

Swiss solar plane completes flight across Switzerland

Britain fixes Eurofighter ejector seats after Spain crash

WTO ruling doesn't worry Boeing

CHIP TECH
Optical Chip Enables New Approach To Quantum Computing

Spin Soliton Could Be A Hit In Cell Phone Communication

Chip revenue expected to grow 31.5 percent in 2010: Gartner

Computer data stored with 'spintronics'

CHIP TECH
NASA's MODIS And AIRS Instruments Watch Igor Changing Shape And Warming Over 3 Days

A Growing La Nina Chills Out The Pacific

GOES-13's Family of Tropical Cyclones: Karl, Igor And Julia

ISRO To Launch Four Satellites In December

CHIP TECH
Study renews calls for BPA regulation

Nigeria lead contamination may affect 18,000 people: UN

China a beacon for foreign clean tech firms

India scraps approval for Lafarge cement project


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement