Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Toxic computer waste in the developing world
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Jun 10, 2014


Electronic waste or e-waste is the collective name for discarded electronic devices and is a growing problem worldwide as users and businesses upgrade computer equipment and other devices. Given that many of the electronic and other components of such equipment use toxic elements, including arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and various plastics and polymers that can also degrade to toxic compounds, there is a pressing need to manage e-waste with consideration for human health and the environment.

As the developing world continues to develop, standards of living and access to technology increases. Unfortunately, as personal computers, laptops and mobile phones become increasingly common so the problem of recycling and disposal of such devices when they become technologically obsolete rises too, according to research published in the International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management.

Neelu Jain of the PEC University of Technology, in Chandigarh and Pamela Chawla of the Surya World, Surya World Technical Campus in Punjab, India, have estimated the potential number of obsolete desktop and notebook computers and the quantity of various toxic components that will be generated from these devices over the next ten to fifteen years in India.

They suggest that it will take three decades at the current rate of penetration before there is one computer per capita across the nation. However, there will be higher-end users who have more than one device and given a population of almost 1.3 billion, this conservative rate of growth means a lot of computers to be disposed of in that time.

As such, their research suggests that there will be 126 million desktop computers and 900 million notebook computers that will be past their life expectancy by the year 2025. They suggest that computer recycling capacity will need to be able to cope with more than a billion PCs by 2020.

"These results will help waste management authorities in planning appropriate infrastructure and facilities for handling, recycling and disposal of this hazardous waste," the team says. "This analysis does not address distribution of obsolete computers for reuse, recycling and landfill options nor their storage time, which is an important issue to resolve in the future."

Electronic waste or e-waste is the collective name for discarded electronic devices and is a growing problem worldwide as users and businesses upgrade computer equipment and other devices. Given that many of the electronic and other components of such equipment use toxic elements, including arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and various plastics and polymers that can also degrade to toxic compounds, there is a pressing need to manage e-waste with consideration for human health and the environment.

Jain, N. and Chawla, P. (2014) 'Future outflows of toxic material from end-of-life computers in India', Int. J. Environmental Technology and Management, Vol. 17, Nos. 2/3/4, pp.237.

.


Related Links
Inderscience Publishers
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Shatterproof screens that save smartphones
Akron OH (SPX) Jun 10, 2014
University of Akron polymer scientists have developed a transparent electrode that could change the face of smartphones, literally, by making their displays shatterproof. In a recently published scientific paper, researchers demonstrated how a transparent layer of electrodes on a polymer surface could be extraordinarily tough and flexible, withstanding repeated scotch tape peeling and bend ... read more


TECH SPACE
Shatterproof screens that save smartphones

A new way to make laser-like beams using 250x less power

Modeling and simulation in the big data era

Microsoft aims at gamers in opening E3 shot

TECH SPACE
Raytheon awarded contratc for USAF FAB-T satellite terminal program

Mutualink's Fusion Kit Enables On-the-Go Interoperability

NATO agency extends Globalcomms services

Rockwell supplying radios, satellite terminals to Canadian military

TECH SPACE
Roscosmos Scolded for 'Pestering Society' with Proton Crash Theories

SpaceX unveils capsule to ferry astronauts to space

Elon Musk to present manned DragonV2 spacecraft on May 29

Russia puts satellite in orbit from sea platform after 2013 flop

TECH SPACE
Russia, China expand cooperation on satellite navigation

GPS sites in Russia can't be used now for 'military purposes'

Gannet sat nav reveals impact of fishing vessels

Chinese army regulates sat nav use

TECH SPACE
Learn from Google, Airbus chief warns aerospace industry

International research and technology center opened by Boeing

Australia probes possible MH370 witness account

Chinese ship in latest glitch in MH370 search mission

TECH SPACE
EMCORE Introduces Internal Fiber Delay Line System for the Optiva Platform

New analysis eliminates a potential speed bump in quantum computing

NIST chip produces and detects specialized gas for biomedical analysis

Merger planned of electronic component providers

TECH SPACE
Ten year-old Dragon gains new strength

Sentinel-1 aids Balkan flood relief

Japan launches land observing satellite

Airbus partners with BAE for radar satellite imagery

TECH SPACE
Less than 5 percent of Chinese cities meeting air quality standards

New pollution rules will reduce asthma, heart attacks: Obama

Cutting Carbon Emissions Reduces Everyday Air Pollution

Sweden to sue EU for delay on hormone disrupting chemicals




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.