Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Southampton physicists join search for hidden magnetic states
by Staff Writers
Southampton, UK (SPX) Aug 28, 2012


This shows Peter de Groot (2nd from left) and a team of scientists with the BLADE beamline. Credit: University of Southampton.

Physicists from the University of Southampton were among the first researchers to use the new high magnetic-field beamline at Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron facility, to search for 'hidden magnetic states'. If found, they will provide important confirmation of a theoretical model, which could have important applications in magnetic data storage.

Diamond's new I10 Beamline for Advanced Dichroism Experiments (BLADE) beamline, which has 300,000 times the strength of the earth's magnetic field, is providing them with the tools for the search. The beamline was developed through a partnership of several UK universities, including Southampton.

A team led by Professor Peter de Groot, from Southampton's Quantum, Light and Matter Group, consisting of physicists from the University of Southampton, the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford and the Magnetic Spectroscopy Group at Diamond, is looking for 'hidden magnetic states' in a type of magnet that has been identified as an ideal candidate for data storage.

The composition of this magnetic film material is such that it provides sufficient energy barriers to prevent thermally-activated data loss, with the potential to relieve the present limit on the storage density of hard disk drives.

Professor Graham Bowden from the University of Southampton explains: "We are using the 14 Tesla Oxford Instruments superconducting magnet on the BLADE beamline to study exchange-spring magnets. Our exchange-spring magnetic multilayers consist of alternating hard and soft-magnetic layers, in which the magnetisation arranges in spring-like magnetic nanostructures. Such magnets offer additional flexibility in optimising magnetic properties, with possibilities for superior data storage capabilities.

"So far we have identified at least three different classes of exchange-spring magnetic states. Being able to manipulate these states will mean that more than one piece of information can be stored at a given site.

There are also 'hidden magnetic states'. Accessing these new exchange-spring states and their switching processes would be an exciting breakthrough in the field of novel magnetic store media. It will provide important confirmation of the theoretical model developed for exchange spring magnets at Southampton."

The Southampton team has been allocated further beam time to continue this research in early 2013.

Senior Beamline Scientist on BLADE, Dr Peter Bencok adds: "The first results on the new high-field superconducting magnet represent an important milestone, not only for the beamline, but for the whole of Diamond.

Its magnetic field of 14 Tesla is about six times stronger than the saturation magnetization of high purity iron. This beamline also enables studies at the lowest temperature at Diamond of 300 milliKelvin - a chilling minus 272.85 degrees Celsius. The team has worked hard to achieve this milestone and we are really pleased to see that BLADE is playing a key role in important new physics."

The paper 'Magnetic reversal in a YFe2 dominated DyFe2/YFe2 multilayer film' by G. B. G. Stenning, G. J. Bowden, S. A. Gregory, J.-M. L. Beaujour, P. A. J. de Groot, G. van der Laan, L. R. Shelford, P. Bencok, P. Steadman, A. N. Dobrynin, and T. Hesjedal, which is published in Applied Physics Letters.

.


Related Links
University of Southampton
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Ames Laboratory scientists crack long-standing chemistry mystery
Ames IA (SPX) Aug 24, 2012
A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has answered a key question concerning the widely-used Fenton reaction - important in wastewater treatment to destroy hazardous organic chemicals and decontaminate bacterial pathogens and in industrial chemical production. The naturally occurring reaction was first discovered in 1894 by H.J.H. Fenton, a British chemist at C ... read more


TECH SPACE
Samsung vows 'all measures' to keep products in US

'Frankenstein' computer program created

Southampton physicists join search for hidden magnetic states

Is This Real or Just Fantasy? ONR Augmented-Reality Initiative Progresses

TECH SPACE
Lockheed Martin Wins Role on Defense Information Systems Agency Program

Raytheon unveils cross domain strategy to securely access information via mobile devices

NATO Special Forces Taps Mutualink for Global Cross Coalition Communications

Northrop Grumman Demonstrates Integrated Receiver Circuit Under DARPA Program

TECH SPACE
NASA Administrator Announces New Commercial Crew And Cargo Milestones

Ariane 5s are on the move for Arianespace's upcoming missions

Readying the "boost" for Galileo satellites on Arianespace's next Soyuz mission at the Space

ASTRA 2F touches down in French Guiana for Arianespace's next Ariane 5 dual-passenger mission

TECH SPACE
Fourth Galileo satellite reaches French Guiana launch site

A GPS in Your DNA

Next Galileo satellite reaches French Guiana launch site

Raytheon completes GPS OCX iteration 1.4 Critical Design Review

TECH SPACE
China flag carrier reports 77% slump in profit

Swiss fighter jet purchase details agreed despite criticism

India's first Embarer AWAC headed home

ReAgent Supports Space Balloon Project

TECH SPACE
Samsung to invest 779 mn euros in Dutch chipmaker ASML

How to feed data-hungry mobile devices? Use more antennas

Mini-camera with maxi-brainpower

Future memory

TECH SPACE
Landsat Data Continuity Mission Environmental Testing is Underway

Expert Analysis of Energy Infrastructure Using HiRes Satellite Imagery

Vecmap tracks the Asian bush mosquito

NASA Selects Combined Data Services Contract For Polar Satellites

TECH SPACE
Wind concentrates pollutants with unexpected order in an urban environment

China wrestles with acid rain threat

Earthworms soak up heavy metal

Italians protest against pollution from steelworks




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement