. Space Industry and Business News .

Self-assembling Electronic Nano-components
by Staff Writers
Karlsruhe, Germany (SPX) Jun 22, 2011

"Self-organization" of nano-devices: Magnetic molecules (green) arrange on a carbon nanotube (black) to build an electronic component (Photo: C. Grupe, KIT).

Magnetic storage media such as hard drives have revolutionized the handling of information: We are used to dealing with huge quantities of magnetically stored data while relying on highly sensitive electronic components.

And hope to further increase data capacities through ever smaller components. Together with experts from Grenoble and Strasbourg, researchers of KIT's Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) have developed a nano-component based on a mechanism observed in nature.

What if the very tininess of a component prevented one from designing the necessary tools for its manufacture?

One possibility could be to "teach" the individual parts to self-assemble into the desired product. For fabrication of an electronic nano-device, a team of INT researchers headed by Mario Ruben adopted a trick from nature: Synthetic adhesives were applied to magnetic molecules in such a way that the latter docked on to the proper positions on a nanotube without any intervention.

In nature, green leaves grow through a similar self-organizing process without any impetus from subordinate mechanisms. The adoption of such principles to the manufacture of electronic components is a paradigm shift, a novelty.

The nano-switch was developed by a European team of scientists from Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Grenoble, Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux at the University of Strasbourg, and KIT's INT. It is one of the invention's particular features that, unlike the conventional electronic components, the new component does not consist of materials such as metals, alloys or oxides but entirely of soft materials such as carbon nanotubes and molecules.

Terbium, the only magnetic metal atom that is used in the device, is embedded in organic material. Terbium reacts highly sensitively to external magnetic fields. Information as to how this atom aligns along such magnetic fields is efficiently passed on to the current flowing through the nanotube.

The Grenoble CNRS research group headed by Dr. Wolfgang Wernsdorfer succeeded in electrically reading out the magnetism in the environment of the nano-component. ''The demonstrated possibility of addressing electrically single magnetic molecules opens a completely new world to spintronics, where memory, logic and possibly quantum logic may be integrated.

The function of the spintronic nano-device is described in the July issue of Nature Materials (DOI number: 10.1038/Nmat3050)for low temperatures of approximately one degree Kelvin, which is -272 degrees Celsius. Efforts are taken by the team of researchers to further increase the component's working temperature in the near future.

Nature Article

Related Links
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
Space Technology News - Applications and Research

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries

. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NASA's Pleiades Supercomputer Ranks Among World's Fastest
Moffett Field, CA (SPX) Jun 21, 2011
NASA's largest supercomputer is seventh on the TOP500 list of the world's most powerful, high-performance computers. The announcement was made at the 26th International Supercomputing Conference in Hamburg, Germany. Pleiades, located at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., supports more than 1,000 active users around the country who are advancing our knowledge about the Ea ... read more

Nokia's new flagship N9 gets mixed reviews

Self-assembling Electronic Nano-components

Android phones to pit vampires against slayers

NASA's Pleiades Supercomputer Ranks Among World's Fastest

Raytheon Receives US Navy Contract to Support Satellite Communication System

Firebird Uses Three Eyes and Fourth Sensor Payload

New military radio unveiled

Indra To Supply Satellite Communications Systems To Brazil's MoD

Arianespace receives the next Ariane 5 for launch in 2011

SpaceX Secures Launch Contract In Major Asian Market

SES-3 Satellite Arrives At Baikonour Launch Base

Shipments Of Sea Launch Zenit-3Sl Hardware Resume On Schedule

Cont-Trak offers reliable container tracking via satellite

Helping shape space-based technology policies

Russia plans to launch six Glonass satellites in 2011

India plans to make GPS more accurate with GAGAN

Embraer wins more orders for regional jet

Ryanair steals spotlight, Airbus ups pressure on Boeing

China claims its place at Paris airshow

Boeing to Boost 737 Production Rate to 42 Airplanes per Month in 2014

Putting a new spin on computing

Camera lets people shoot first focus later

New compact microspectrometer design achieves high resolution and wide bandwidth

Researchers Break Light-Matter Coupling Strength Limit in Nanoscale Semiconductors

NASA/NOAA GOES Project Releases 2 Week Movie of Chilean Volcanic Eruption

Landsat 5 Satellite Sees Mississippi River Floodwaters Lingering

Landsat 5 Satellite Helps Emergency Managers Fight Largest Fire in Arizona History

Earth from Space: A gush of volcanic gas

Nepal marks becoming land mine-free

Rio eco-summit 'top priority' for UN

Lead-poisoned Chinese children denied care: HRW

Bangladesh shipyards back in business

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement