Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Scientists claim new glasses-free 3D for cellphone
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) March 20, 2013


BlackBerry founders start quantum computing fund
Ottawa (AFP) March 20, 2013 - BlackBerry co-founders Mike Lazaridis and Doug Fregin reunited on Wednesday to fund advances in quantum computing, which promises to vastly increase the speed of computers.

The duo, who started BlackBerry in 1984, announced the creation of a Can$100 million ($98 million) fund to provide "financial and intellectual capital" for development and commercialization of quantum computing breakthroughs.

Quantum Valley Investments will be based in Waterloo, Ontario, where BlackBerry (formerly known as Research In Motion) has its headquarters and where Lazaridis -- who quit BlackBerry in 2012 -- has already helped set up a theoretical science institute.

The aim is to transform Waterloo into "Canada's Quantum Valley," in the same way discoveries at Bell Labs led to the emergence of Silicon Valley, Lazaridis said.

Research into using quantum mechanics to harness the power of atoms and molecules in computing is still in its infancy, but proponents say it has great promise.

Quantum computing expands on the most basic piece of information that a typical computer understands -- a bit.

While a normal bit can only have a value of "1" or "0," qubits can hold either value or both at the same time, allowing a quantum computer to process a vast number of calculations simultaneously.

Lazaridis started investing in quantum computing research in 1999 when he gave $100 million to help establish the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo.

Since then he has also donated millions of dollars to the University of Waterloo for its Institute for Quantum Computing and its Quantum Nano-Centre, which houses the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology.

Fancy watching a movie on your mobile phone, where figures leap out from the screen in 3D, rather as Princess Leia did in that scene from "Star Wars"?

That's the claim made by US researchers, who on Wednesday reported they had made a display which gives a three-dimensional image that can be viewed without special glasses and is intended for cellphones, tablets and watches.

Unlike the holographic projection used in George Lucas' movie fantasy, their small prototype display is flat and backlit.

It uses a technology called diffractive optics to give 3D images that can be viewed from multiple angles, even if the device is tilted.

"Unlike a lot of technology out there that only does so-called horizontal parallax, which means that you only see 3D when you move your head left and right, we actually are talking about a technology that gives 3D for full parallax," said David Fattal, who led a team at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories in Palo Alto, California.

"For example, if you were to display a 3D image of Planet Earth with the North Pole facing out from the screen, by turning your head around the display, you would actually be able to have a view of any country on the globe, you would be able to see all the way around," Fattal told journalists in a telebriefing.

Diffractive optics meet a challenge posed by the human anatomy, according to the study, published on Wednesday by the journal Nature.

Humans view the world stereoscopically, meaning that our two eyes see two slightly different images because they are separated by about six centimetres (two and a half inches).

2D screening provides only a single flat image, which means the two eyes both see the same picture on the screen.

3D imaging, therefore, has to present a slightly different image to each eye.

Glasses-based systems work by having two lenses that each polarise the light in different directions, or by having cheap-and-cheerful -- and headache-inducing -- lenses of red and green. In the first case, the display has two simultaneous images, each with different polarisation; in the second, the two images have red and green outlines.

Current glasses-free systems, including some mobiles, use thin lenses called lenticules or parallax barriers that send an image towards each eye.

But the 3D effect is limited and can only be perceived if the viewer is positioned in a narrow zone so that the correct eye gets the correct image.

The best option would be Princess Leia-style holography. But right now, this cannot be used for images displayed at a normal video rate, as the demands in pixel density are just too great.

The new "autostereoscopic multiview display" uses a backlight whose surface has been etched with tiny refractors.

Each of these microscopic deflectors send individual points of light in specific directions. These individual pixels, put together, comprise the different images sent to each eyeball.

The demonstration models can send light in 14 distinct viewing directions, providing the 3D effect in an angle of 90 degrees at a distance of up to a metre (3.25 feet). Tests have been carried out with images or footage, at 30 frames per second, of flowers, a turtle or a corporate logo.

The scientists said the design can be ramped up to produce up to 64 directions, further widening the viewing zone.

Using glass of high refractive index, the field of view could be "close to 180 degrees," they add.

"This current prototype is completely transparent and we think that even using a modulating device to achieve video rates, we can still retain most of the transparency," said Fattal.

In commentary also carried by Nature, University of Cambridge computer specialist Neil Dodgson said major challenges lay ahead before the exploit would be commercially viable.

The new illumination system has much smaller pixels than mobile devices today, so more work has to be done to ensure that picture quality -- which depends on pixel density -- is not lost.

Another hurdle is to have the device manufactured "reliably, robustly and in quantity," which may take years, said Dodgson, who also pointed to the expense of providing content filmed in 3D in order to provide the multiple images.

"The more nebulous question... (is) whether humans want or need 3D displays," he noted. "Time will tell."

.


Related Links
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
SXSW kicks off with vision of a 3D printing revolution
Austin, Texas (AFP) March 8, 2013
The 27th edition of South by Southwest kicked off Friday with a bold prediction that desktop 3D printing will unleash a new industrial revolution guided by "creative explorers." Inventing or replicating everyday objects in three dimensions using laser beams and molten plastic is a major theme of the interactive segment of the 10-day SXSW festival that also celebrates independent film and mus ... read more


TECH SPACE
Smartphone app turns home drone into spacecraft

Scientists claim new glasses-free 3D for cellphone

NASA Awards Astrotech Contract For SMAP Spacecraft Processing

Videogame power harnessed for positive goals

TECH SPACE
Soldiers and Families Can Suffer Negative Effects from Modern Communication Technologies

DARPA Seeks More Robust Military Wireless Networks

DoD Selects Northrop Grumman for Joint Command and Control System

Northrop Grumman Highlights Affordable Milspace Communications

TECH SPACE
Sea Launch and EchoStar Reach Preliminary Agreement for Launch Services

Estonia's student cubesat satellite is ready for the next Vega launch

Vega receives its upper stage as the next mission's two primary passengers land in French Guiana

Grasshopper Successfully Completes 80M Hover Slam

TECH SPACE
Galileo fixes Europe's position in history

China city searching for 'modern Marco Polo'

Milestone for European navigation system

China targeting navigation system's global coverage by 2020

TECH SPACE
Northrop Grumman Delivers 100th Center Fuselage for F-35 Lightning II

EU puts airline carbon tax on hold for a year

First Lockheed Martin F-35As Report to Nellis AFB for Operational Testing

Listening for the Boom and Rattle of Supersonic Flight

TECH SPACE
NIST microscope measures nanomagnet property vital to 'spintronics'

Surprising Control over Photoelectrons from a Topological Insulator

Organic nanowires open the way for optoelectronic device miniaturization

Ultra-high-speed optical communications link sets new power efficiency record

TECH SPACE
CSTARS Awarded Funding Over Three Years By Office of Naval Research

Google Maps adds view from Mt. Everest

Significant reduction in temperature and vegetation seasonality over northern latitudes

GOCE: the first seismometer in orbit

TECH SPACE
Hong Kong light pollution 'one of world's worst'

China to more than double air monitoring network

Little faith in China leaders' pollution promises

Dead pigs contaminating Chinese river?




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement