Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
SMOS satellite measurements improve as ground radars switch off
by Staff Writers
Paris, France (ESA) Jul 10, 2012


The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission makes global observations of soil moisture over Earth's landmasses and salinity over the oceans. Variations in soil moisture and ocean salinity are a consequence of the continuous exchange of water between the oceans, the atmosphere and the land - Earth's water cycle. For other SMOS images and results please go here.

Over a dozen radio signals that have hindered data collection on ESA's SMOS water mission have been switched off. The effort also benefits satellites such as NASA's Aquarius mission, which measures ocean salinity at the same frequency. We all know what happens when you place a cell phone too close to a speaker: seconds before the phone rings, that obnoxious buzz interrupts your favourite song.

This is radio interference - an unwanted reception of radio signals. Not only can it interrupt the music from your stereo, it can also impede satellite measurements.

ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched in 2009 to improve our understanding of our planet's water cycle. In order to do this, it measures the microwaves emitted by Earth in the 1400-1427 MHz range.

SMOS immediately revealed that many unlawful signals were being transmitted around the world in this frequency range, rendering some of its measurements unusable for scientific purposes.

Over the years, ESA has investigated exactly where the interference is coming from.

As national authorities have collaborated with ESA to pinpoint the origin and switch these unlawful emissions off, the interference has waned.

One of the largest areas of contamination in the northern hemisphere is over the North Pacific and Atlantic oceans, primarily from military radars.

Over recent years, authorities from Canada and Greenland have been asked to take action. Canada started to refurbish their equipment in late 2011, while Greenland switched off their transmitters in March 2011.

At least 13 sources of interference have now been switched off in the northern latitudes. This has significantly improved SMOS observations at these high latitudes, which were previously so contaminated that accurate salinity measurements were not possible above 45 degrees latitude as the satellite headed north.

However, the few remaining sources can contaminate areas 3000 km away, especially as SMOS climbs north towards North America.

The efforts to reduce interference will benefit other missions carrying similar detectors, such as NASA's Aquarius satellite, which was launched last year.

Aquarius also observes ocean salinity and, in addition, it measures sea-surface roughness to help understand how roughness affects salinity measurements.

A unique feature of SMOS is that it also measures soil moisture. SMOS and Aquarius readings are highly complementary: SMOS repeats coverage faster and at finer detail, while Aquarius has better 'pixel by pixel' accuracy.

Scientists are trying to combine both sets of measurements in the best way to improve global salinity maps.

"Combining SMOS and Aquarius new observations will allow us to map ocean surface salinity with an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution," said Nicolas Reul from the French Research Institute for Exploration of the Sea.

"In particular, salinity fronts and the movement of water across tropical oceans and within strong currents - such as the Gulf Stream - shall be better detected and tracked than with single-sensor observations."

.


Related Links
SMOS
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Lockheed Martin Skunk Works Receives DARPA ALASA Contract Award
Palmdale CA (SPX) Jul 06, 2012
Lockheed Martin has been selected by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to receive a Phase I Airborne Launch Assist Space Access (ALASA) program study contract valued at about $6.2 million. The ALASA program is a research and development effort maturing technologies to maintain vital satellite capabilities during a crisis. "Our approach uses a tactical aircraft to ... read more


TECH SPACE
Naturally adhesive

SMOS satellite measurements improve as ground radars switch off

New technique could reduce number of animals needed to test chemical safety

Physicists find chink in the Batsuit

TECH SPACE
Lockheed Martin Selected to Manage Major Defense Information Systems Network Operations

Lockheed Martin Selected to Deliver Major Improvements to DoD's ISR Information Sharing Capabilities

Boeing FAB-T Demonstrates Communications with On-orbit AEHF Satellite

Lockheed Martin Completes Environmental Testing on Second US Navy Satellite

TECH SPACE
Ariane 5 ECA orbits EchoStar XVII and MSG-3

ATK Unveils Unique Liberty Capability

Avanti Announces Launch Date for HYLAS 2 Satellite

Three Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne RS-68A Engines Power Delta IV Heavy Upgrade Vehicle on Inaugural Flight

TECH SPACE
Announcement of ACRIDS product line for Precision Airdrop Systems

SSTL announces exactView-1 satellite launch date

Galileo pathfinder GIOVE-A retires

ESA extends its navigation lab in readiness for Galileo testing

TECH SPACE
U.K. boosts up-armed Typhoon for Mideast

Brazil jet bid extended 6 months

Boeing predicts $4.5 trillion market for 34,000 new airplanes

Poland orders more C295s, produces helos

TECH SPACE
Intel pumps billions into computer chip tool maker

Japan's Renesas eyes $550 mn savings, cutting 5,000 jobs

Discovery of material with amazing properties

Micron to buy troubled Japan chip-maker Elpida

TECH SPACE
MSG-3 set to ensure quality of Europe's weather service from geostationary orbit

Images in an Instant: Suomi NPP Begins Direct Broadcast

Satellite research reveals smaller volcanoes could cool climate

NASA Satellites Examine a Powerful Summer Storm

TECH SPACE
Chinese factories shut amid lead poisoning fears

Nitrogen pollution changing Rocky Mountain National Park vegetation

Plastic pollution reaching surprising levels off coast of Pacific Northwest

Novel clay-based coating may point the way to new generation of green flame retardants




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement