Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Russian satellite hit by remnants of destroyed Chinese spacecraft
by Staff Writers
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Mar 12, 2013


File image.

A small Russian spacecraft in orbit appears to have been struck by remnants of a destroyed Chinese satellite. It's just the second time in history that an active spacecraft has collided with an artificial object while in orbit.

The collision took place between Russia's Ball Lens in the Space (BLITS) spacecraft and China's Fengyun 1C satellite, according to the Center for Space Standards and Innovation (CSSI), based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The collision appears to have occurred on January 22, although it took over a month to determine what exactly hit the craft.

The Chinese material is considered to be "space junk" left over from when the Chinese craft was destroyed in a 2007 anti-satellite demonstration when the Fengyun 1C was intentionally demolished after exceeding its service life. The debris has posed a threat to satellites and crewed spacecraft ever since, according to Space.com.

The space collision involving BLITS was first reported on February 4 by Russian scientists Vasiliy Yurasov and Andrew Nazarenko, of the Institute for Precision Instrument Engineering (IPIE) in Moscow. They reported a "significant change" in the orbit of the BLITS satellite to CSSI, as well as changes in the spacecraft's spin velocity and altitude.

"As a result, an abrupt change occurred to the BLITS orbit parameters (a decrease of the orbiting period)," ILRS officials said. The BLITS spin period changed from 5.6 seconds before collision to 2.1 seconds after collision. The craft also experienced a sudden decrease of 120 meters in the semi-major axis of its orbit.

While the BLITS satellite weighs 7.5kg, the weight of the piece that struck it may only be around .08 grams. BLITS is a retroreflector demonstration satellite built for precision satellite laser-ranging experiments. It was launched in 2009 and expected to last five years in space.

It remains unclear whether the satellite is merely damaged or completely non-functioning.

The collision marks the second time that an active spacecraft has collided with another artificial object in space. In February 2009, a US communications satellite was hit by a defunct Russian military satellite, creating a large debris cloud in orbit.

Source: Voice of Russia

.


Related Links
Roscosmos
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Space Fence program moving forward
Hanscom AFB MA (SPX) Dec 24, 2012
The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center here recently put out a request for proposal to move the Space Fence program forward. Space Fence will be a system of up to two land-based radars, the first site located at Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands, to track objects entering Earth's orbit. According to program officials, it will form the foundation of improved space situationa ... read more


TECH SPACE
Russian satellite hit by remnants of destroyed Chinese spacecraft

NUS graphene researchers create 'superheated' water that can corrode diamonds

Activists fault WHO report on Fukushima radiation

SimCity climbing from launch wreckage

TECH SPACE
INTEROP-7000 uses ISSI to link IP-based voice comms with legacy radio

Space race under way to create quantum satellite

Boeing Receives USAF Contract for Integrated C4ISR Targeting Solution

Air Operations Center Modernization Program PDR Completed

TECH SPACE
Vega launcher integration continues for its April mission

SpaceX's capsule arrives at ISS

Dragon Transporting Two ISS Experiments For AMES

SpaceX Optimistic Despite Dragon Capsule Mishap

TECH SPACE
China city searching for 'modern Marco Polo'

Milestone for European navigation system

China targeting navigation system's global coverage by 2020

Russian GLONASS space satellite group again at full strength

TECH SPACE
SNC, Embraer weigh in on Air Force award

Cathay Pacific says 2012 net profit slumps 83.3%

Beechcraft fights defense Embraer contract

Upgraded early warning aircraft arrive in Taiwan

TECH SPACE
Creating indestructible self-healing circuits

Improving Electronics by Solving Nearly Century-old Problem

UCSB physicists make discovery in the quantum realm

First discovery of a natural topological insulator

TECH SPACE
Significant reduction in temperature and vegetation seasonality over northern latitudes

GOCE: the first seismometer in orbit

Japan's huge quake heard from space: study

Space station to watch for Earth disasters

TECH SPACE
Dead pigs contaminating Chinese river?

Toxic gas leak in South Korea, 11 hospitalised

Japan warns about smog drifting from China

Electronic waste recycling on the increase




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement