Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Projecting a Three-Dimensional Future
by Staff Writers
Tel Aviv, Israel (SPX) Jul 10, 2014


The applications for the technology are vast and diverse, according to the researchers, who have already been approached by commercial entities interested in the technology.

Since the 1960s, theatergoers have shelled out for crude 3-D glasses, polarized glasses, and shutter glasses to enhance their viewing experience. These basic devices, used to trick the brain into perceiving an artificial three-dimensional reality, may soon be rendered obsolete with the introduction of new holography technology developed by Tel Aviv University researchers.

Tel Aviv University doctoral students Yuval Yifat, Michal Eitan, and Zeev Iluz have developed highly efficient holography based on nanoantennas that could be used for security as well as medical and recreational purposes.

Prof. Yael Hanein, of TAU's School of Electrical Engineering and head of TAU's Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Prof. Jacob Scheuer and Prof. Amir Boag of the School of Electrical Engineering, led the development team. Their research, published in the American Chemical Society's publication Nano Letters, uses the parameters of light itself to create dynamic and complex holographic images.

In order to effect a three-dimensional projection using existing technology, two-dimensional images must be "replotted" - rotated and expanded to achieve three-dimension-like vision. But the team's nanoantenna technology permits newly designed holograms to replicate the appearance of depth without being replotted.

The applications for the technology are vast and diverse, according to the researchers, who have already been approached by commercial entities interested in the technology.

Taking out the map
"We had this interesting idea - to play with the parameters of light, the phase of light," said Yifat.

"If we could dynamically change the relation between light waves, we could create something that projected dynamically - like holographic television, for example. The applications for this are endless. If you take light and shine it on a specially engineered nanostructure, you can project it in any direction you want and in any form that you want. This leads to interesting results."

The researchers worked in the lab for over a year to develop and patent a small metallic nanoantenna chip that, together with an adapted holography algorithm, could determine the "phase map" of a light beam. "Phase corresponds with the distance light waves have to travel from the object you are looking at to your eye," said Prof. Hanein.

"In real objects, our brains know how to interpret phase information so you get a feeling of depth, but when you look at a photograph, you often lose this information so the photographs look flat. Holograms save the phase information, which is the basis of 3-D imagery. This is truly one of the holy grails of visual technology."

According to the researchers, their methodology is the first of its kind to successfully produce high-resolution holographic imagery that can be projected efficiently in any direction.

"We can use this technology to reflect any desired object," said Prof. Scheuer.

"Before, scientists were able to produce only basic shapes - circles and stripes, for example. We used, as our model, the logo of Tel Aviv University, which has a very specific design, and were able to achieve the best results seen yet."

The key to complex imagery
"This can be used for scientific research, security, medical, engineering, and recreational purposes," said Prof. Scheuer.

"Imagine a surgeon, who is forced to replot several CAT-SCAN images to generate an accurate picture. By generating just one holographic image, she could examine symptoms from every angle. Similarly, an architect could draw up a holographic blueprint that he could actually walk through and inspect. The applications are truly endless."

The new technology could also be used to improve laser-based radars used for military purposes as well as advance anti-counterfeiting techniques that safeguard against theft.

"We optimized holograms to the highest resolution and created a new methodology able to produce any arbitrary image," said Prof. Scheuer. "Everything was done here, at the facilities of Tel Aviv University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology; including the fabrication, characterization and experiments."

The researchers are currently developing technology that will allow holographic images to change shape and move.

.


Related Links
Tel Aviv University
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Does 3D printing have the right stuff?
Paris (ESA) Jul 03, 2014
3D-printed parts promise a revolution in the space industry, rapidly creating almost any object needed. But do the results really have the right stuff for flying in space? ESA is now checking if their surface finish comes up to scratch. 3D printing involves building an item by laying down successive layers of material, rather than cutting away from a solid block. ESA's Clean Space initiati ... read more


TECH SPACE
Saab, Selex ES sign radar contract deal

Royal Air Force's Tornado aircraft getting new RF jamming pods

Projecting a Three-Dimensional Future

No-wait data centers

TECH SPACE
Third MUOS satellite heads for final checkout

Saab reports U.S. Army order for radio systems

Thales enhancing communications of EU peacekeepers

Exelis enhancing communications for NATO country

TECH SPACE
45th Space Wing launches 6 second-generation ORBCOMM satellites

Sanctions on Russian launchers confers advantage to others

Orbital launches cargo ship to space station

Arianespace launches O3b Networks via Soyuz rocket

TECH SPACE
Russian GLONASS to Boost Yield Capacity by 50 percent

US Refusal to Host GLONASS Base a Form of Competition with Russia

New device developed to defeat GPS jamming

EU selects CGI to support Galileo Commercial Service Initiative

TECH SPACE
Lockheed opening new office in Britain

Mobile air traffic control communications system makes debut

Airbus supplying more aircraft to Egyptian Air Force

Brazil's Embraer sells 60 commercial planes to China

TECH SPACE
Rice's silicon oxide memories catch manufacturers' eye

IBM to spend $3 bn aiming for computer chip breakthrough

Stanford engineers envision an electronic switch just 3 atoms thick

The new atomic age: building smaller, greener electronics

TECH SPACE
Hyperspec Sensors Target Vegetation Fluorescence

Ten-Year Endeavor: NASA's Aura Tracks Pollutants

New Satellite Imagery Now Available for ArcGIS Online Users Worldwide

NASA's RapidScat to Unveil Hidden Cycles of Sea Winds

TECH SPACE
Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought

New study links dredging to diseased corals

Italy cruise ship toxins threaten wildlife: activists

Straits of Mackinac 'worst possible place' for a Great Lakes oil spill




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.