Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




CHIP TECH
New magnetic semiconductor material holds promise for 'spintronics'
by Staff Writers
Raleigh NC (SPX) Sep 14, 2013


File image.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have created a new compound that can be integrated into silicon chips and is a dilute magnetic semiconductor - meaning that it could be used to make "spintronic" devices, which rely on magnetic force to operate, rather than electrical currents.

The researchers synthesized the new compound, strontium tin oxide (Sr3SnO), as an epitaxial thin film on a silicon chip. Epitaxial means the material is a single crystal. Because Sr3SnO is a dilute magnetic semiconductor, it could be used to create transistors that operate at room temperature based on magnetic fields, rather than electrical current.

"We're talking about cool transistors for use in spintronics," says Dr. Jay Narayan, John C. Fan Distinguished Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State and senior author of a paper describing the work. "Spintronics" refers to technologies used in solid-state devices that take advantage of the inherent "spin" in electrons and their related magnetic momentum.

"There are other materials that are dilute magnetic semiconductors, but researchers have struggled to integrate those materials on a silicon substrate, which is essential for their use in multifunctional, smart devices," Narayan says. "We were able to synthesize this material as a single crystal on a silicon chip."

"This moves us closer to developing spin-based devices, or spintronics," says Dr. Justin Schwartz, co-author of the paper, Kobe Steel Distinguished Professor and Department Head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at NC State. "And learning that this material has magnetic semiconductor properties was a happy surprise."

The researchers had set out to create a material that would be a topological insulator. In topological insulators the bulk of the material serves as an electrical insulator, but the surface can act as a highly conductive material - and these properties are not easily affected or destroyed by defects in the material. In effect, that means that a topological insulator material can be a conductor and its own insulator at the same time.

Two materials are known to be topological insulators - bismuth telluride and bismuth selenide. But theorists predicted that other materials may also have topological insulator properties. Sr3SnO is one of those theoretical materials, which is why the researchers synthesized it. However, while early tests are promising, the researchers are still testing the Sr3SnO to confirm whether it has all the characteristics of a topological insulator.

The paper, "Epitaxial integration of dilute magnetic semiconductor Sr3SnO with Si (001)," was published online Sept. 9 in Applied Physics Letters. Lead author of the paper is Y. F. Lee, a Ph.D. student at NC State. Co-authors include F. Wu and R. Kumar, both Ph.D. students at NC State, and Dr. Frank Hunte, an assistant professor at NC State. The work was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation.

.


Related Links
North Carolina State University
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CHIP TECH
China fire rattles world chip supply chain
Shanghai (AFP) Sept 12, 2013
A fire at a giant Chinese factory making almost one sixth of the world's supply of a key high-tech component shows how vulnerable global manufacturing chains can be to an unexpected event, analysts say. The vast SK Hynix facility in Wuxi city produces dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips, used to store data in personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. Th ... read more


CHIP TECH
First laser-like X-ray light from a solid

Space's 'Ferrari' set to fall to Earth

Chinese-built Bolivian satellite tested in space simulator

Indiana Jones meets George Jetson

CHIP TECH
Unified Military Intelligence Picture Helping to Dispel the Fog of War

New Military Communications Satellite Built By Lockheed Martin Launches

US Navy Poised to Launch Lockheed Martin-Built Secure Communications Satellite for Mobile Users

Northrop Grumman Moves New B-2 Satellite Communications Concept to the High Ground

CHIP TECH
Russian space official denies report of problem in Soyuz return

Lockheed Martin Atlas V To Launch Morelos-3 ComSat

Japan sets new date for satellite rocket launch

Arianespace delivers! EUTELSAT 25B/Es'hail 1 and GSAT-7 are orbited by Ariane 5

CHIP TECH
Location services grow for smartphone users: survey

Galileo's secure service tested by Member States

European Union countries in test of home-grown GPS system

Satellite tracking of zebra migrations in Africa is conservation aid

CHIP TECH
Raytheon moves forward on DARPA Persistent Close Air Support program

USAF and Boeing Finalize KC-46A Tanker Aircraft Design

Boeing Forecasts China's Fleet to Triple Over Next 20 Years

BAE considers military refueling conversion for commercial jet

CHIP TECH
New magnetic semiconductor material holds promise for 'spintronics'

Growing thin films of germanium

Shining a little light changes metal into semiconductor

Engineers improve electronic devices using molybdenum disulfide

CHIP TECH
Using digital SLRs to measure the height of Northern Lights

After a Fire, Before a Flood: NASA's Landsat Directs Restoration to At-Risk Areas

JIB Antennas Will Support Ship ID Capability Being Added to Canadas RADARSAT Constellation Mission

Reflecting on Earth's albedo

CHIP TECH
China vows air pollution cuts in major cities

Over-pumping sucks arsenic into Hanoi's water

Old concrete can protect nature

Bacteria supplemented their diet to clean up after Deep Water Horizon oil spill




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement