Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Industry and Business News .




CHIP TECH
New analysis eliminates a potential speed bump in quantum computing
by Staff Writers
San Diego CA (SPX) May 23, 2014


In a complete graph (left) every node is connected to every other. For other well studied graphs, the Paley graph in the center and the Latin square graph on the right, that is not true. A quantum particle could hop directly to the target position, in red, only from connected nodes, marked in blue. Image courtesy Tom Wong, UC San Diego.

A quantum particle can search for an item in an unsorted "database" by jumping from one item to another in superposition, and it does so faster than a classical computer ever could.

This assertion assumes, however, that the particle can directly hop from any item to any other. Any restriction on which items the particle can directly hop to could slow down the search.

"Intuition says that a symmetric database allows the particle to hop freely enough to retain the quantum speedup, but our research has shown this intuition to be false," says Tom Wong, a physicist at the University of California, San Diego.

In a paper accepted for publication by Physical Review Letters, the researchers used a technique familiar to physicists called "degenerate perturbation theory" in a novel way to prove that global symmetry is not required for a sped up search.

Information scientists represent the database to be searched as a graph. In globally symmetric graphs, the nodes can be swapped with each other such that the connections between them are preserved. "Strongly regular graphs" don't share this property, but this analysis shows they also support a fast search through local symmetries.

Their finding extends the use of this theory to the field of quantum information science and expands the kinds of data structures on which quantum computing outperforms classical computing.

Jonatan Janmark, KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden and UC San Diego's Department of Mathematics and David Meyer, professor of mathematics at UC San Diego co-authored the work.

.


Related Links
University of California - San Diego
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CHIP TECH
Magnetic Compass Orientation in Birds Builds Case for Bio-Inspired Sensors
Washington DC (SPX) May 16, 2014
Researchers working on DARPA's Quantum Effects in Biological Environments (QuBE) program have shown that the electromagnetic noise that permeates modern urban environments can disrupt a bird's internal magnetic compass. The findings settle a decades-long debate into whether low-level, artificial electric and magnetic fields can affect biological processes in higher vertebrates. For DARPA, the re ... read more


CHIP TECH
Is there really cash in your company's trash?

Computer simulations enable better calculation of interfacial tension

Professors' super waterproof surfaces cause water to bounce like a ball

New Technique Safely Penetrates Top Coat for Perfect Paint Job

CHIP TECH
Airbus boosts communication capability for British ships

Harris providing tactical communications to country in central Asia

Production Ramps Up on next Advanced EHF Birds

A Multi-Billion Dollar Military Satellite Market

CHIP TECH
SpaceX-3 Mission To Return Dragon's Share of Space Station Science

SpaceX supply capsule heads back to Earth

SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft returns to Earth from space station

Replacing Russian-made rocket engines is not easy

CHIP TECH
Sixth Boeing GPS IIF Spacecraft Reaches Orbit, Sends First Signals

British MoD works on 'quantum compass' technology to replace GPS

Iran to Host Russian Satellite Navigation Facility

Moscow to suspend American GPS sites on Russian territory from June

CHIP TECH
Real-time flight tracking possible, not expensive: Airbus official

NASA Partners with Rolls-Royce on Braze Joint Technology Testing

Engineers Find Way to Lower Risk of Midair Collisions for Small Aircraft

Berliners to vote on future of airport-turned-playground

CHIP TECH
New analysis eliminates a potential speed bump in quantum computing

Magnetic Compass Orientation in Birds Builds Case for Bio-Inspired Sensors

A Lab in Your Pocket

Molecular Foundry Opens the Door to Better Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals

CHIP TECH
Earth Science Applications Travelogue: Maury Estes

GOES-R Propulsion and System Modules Delivered

Experts demonstrate versatility of Sentinel-1

Kazakhstan's First Earth Observation Satellite to Orbit

CHIP TECH
Dangerous nitrogen pollution could be halved

Study lists dangerous chemicals linked to breast cancer

Study strengthens link between neonicotinoids and collapse of honey bee colonies

China detains 60 people over incinerator protest




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.