Space Industry and Business News  





.
TECH SPACE
NIST nanomagnets offer food for thought about computer memories

This is a collage of NIST "nano-eggs" - simulated magnetic patterns in NIST's egg-shaped nanoscale magnets.
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Apr 29, 2011
Magnetics researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) colored lots of eggs recently. Bunnies and children might find the eggs a bit small-in fact, too small to see without a microscope.

But these "eggcentric" nanomagnets have another practical use, suggesting strategies for making future low-power computer memories.

For a study described in a new paper,* NIST researchers used electron-beam lithography to make thousands of nickel-iron magnets, each about 200 nanometers (billionths of a meter) in diameter.

Each magnet is ordinarily shaped like an ellipse, a slightly flattened circle. Researchers also made some magnets in three different egglike shapes with an increasingly pointy end. It's all part of NIST research on nanoscale magnetic materials, devices and measurement methods to support development of future magnetic data storage systems.

It turns out that even small distortions in magnet shape can lead to significant changes in magnetic properties. Researchers discovered this by probing the magnets with a laser and analyzing what happens to the "spins" of the electrons, a quantum property that's responsible for magnetic orientation. Changes in the spin orientation can propagate through the magnet like waves at different frequencies.

The more egg-like the magnet, the more complex the wave patterns and their related frequencies. (Something similar happens when you toss a pebble in an asymmetrically shaped pond.) The shifts are most pronounced at the ends of the magnets.

To confirm localized magnetic effects and "color" the eggs, scientists made simulations of various magnets using NIST's object-oriented micromagnetic framework (OOMMF).** (See graphic.) Lighter colors indicate stronger frequency signals.

The egg effects explain erratic behavior observed in large arrays of nanomagnets, which may be imperfectly shaped by the lithography process. Such distortions can affect switching in magnetic devices.

The egg study results may be useful in developing random-access memories (RAM) based on interactions between electron spins and magnetized surfaces. Spin-RAM is one approach to making future memories that could provide high-speed access to data while reducing processor power needs by storing data permanently in ever-smaller devices.

Shaping magnets like eggs breaks up a symmetric frequency pattern found in ellipse structures and thus offers an opportunity to customize and control the switching process.

"For example, intentional patterning of egg-like distortions into spinRAM memory elements may facilitate more reliable switching," says NIST physicist Tom Silva, an author of the new paper.

"Also, this study has provided the Easter Bunny with an entirely new market for product development."

H.T. Nembach, J.M. Shaw, T.J. Silva, W.L. Johnson, S.A. Kim, R.D. McMichael and P. Kabos. Effects of shape distortions and imperfections on mode frequencies and collective linewidths in nanomagnets. Physical Review B 83, 094427, March 28, 2011.




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Space Technology News - Applications and Research



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
TECH SPACE
Researchers working to advance predictability research initiatives
Norman OK (SPX) Apr 27, 2011
Faculty from the University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology are leading the school's predictability research initiatives with multiple projects that could one day lead to more accurate forecasts of weather-related events, including landslides and tornadoes. In the Southern Plains region of the United States, people think of thunderstorms and tornadoes when severe weather is forecasted. H ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


TECH SPACE
Thousands queue for iPad 2 across Asia

New polymer structures for use as plastic electronics

NIST nanomagnets offer food for thought about computer memories

Chinese pay price for world's rare earths addiction

TECH SPACE
Lockheed Martin Demonstrates Integration of MONAX Communications System with Air Force Base Network

Preparations Underway As US Army Gears Up For Large-Scale Network Evaluations

Global Military Communications Market In 2010

Raytheon BBN Technologies To Protect Internet Comms For Military Abroad

TECH SPACE
GSAT-8 put through its paces

Ariane Ariane 5 enjoys second successful launch for 2011

Ariane rocket launches two telecoms satellites

SpaceX aims to put man on Mars in 10-20 years

TECH SPACE
GPS Operational Control Segment Enters Service With USAF

Apple denies tracking iPhones, to fix 'bugs'

GPS IIF Satellite Delivered to Cape Canaveral

S. Korea probes Apple about tracking feature

TECH SPACE
Brazil's key airports set to go private

Extreme testing for rotor blades

ANA returns to profit, faces uncertain outlook

DLR measures the shape of a barn owl wing in flight

TECH SPACE
China's Huawei sues ZTE for patent infringement

Zeroing in on the Elusive Green LED

Conducting ferroelectrics may be key to new electronic memory

LED efficiency puzzle solved

TECH SPACE
NASA Mission Seeks to Uncover a Rainfall Mystery

Satellite tracking of sea turtles reveals potential threat posed by manmade chemicals

GOES-13 Satellite Eyeing System With High Risk of Severe Weather

Running ring around hurricanes predictions

TECH SPACE
Mercury converted to its most toxic form in ocean waters

Researchers Find Fat Turns Into Soap In Sewers

Toxic chemicals found in pet dogs

Toxic mud disaster leaves deep scars in Hungary


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement