Space Industry and Business News  





. NASA Extends Mission For Ball Aerospace-Built ICESat

ICESat began its fourteenth science campaign return on Saturday, Feb. 16, following calibration tests that further improve pointing. The mission currently collects laser returns for approximately 30 days at three- to six-month intervals.
by Staff Writers
Boulder CO (SPX) Feb 21, 2008
The Ice, Cloud and Land Satellite (ICESat) built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. will continue operations until at least 2010 following a NASA mission extension contract. ICESat, designed for a three-year lifetime with a five-year goal, was launched Jan. 12, 2003. The Ball Commercial Platform (BCP) 2000 employed for ICESat was built under contract to NASA's Rapid Space Development Office (RSDO).

"The ICESat BCP has demonstrated that it can meet the demanding rigors of environmental and remote-sensing requirements and joins other Ball spacecraft in consistently exceeding lifetime minimum requirements," said Cary Ludtke, vice president and general manager for Ball's civil and commercial business unit.

ICESat has made significant contributions to the measurement of ice sheet elevation, cloud and aerosol heights, as well as land topography and vegetation characteristics. The mission provides multi-year elevation data needed to determine ice sheet mass balance and cloud property information, and provides topography and vegetation data from around the globe as well as polar-specific coverage over the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.

ICESat began its fourteenth science campaign return on Saturday, Feb. 16, following calibration tests that further improve pointing. The mission currently collects laser returns for approximately 30 days at three- to six-month intervals.

During each orbit, the spacecraft's Geoscience Laser Altimeter, built by Goddard Space Flight Center, points at the same ground track as it passes over the polar regions and Greenland. The observing campaign also requires the spacecraft to point at approximately 10 targets of opportunity and return several ocean scans daily.

In addition to ICESat, the Ball Aerospace's QuikSCAT, and the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) spacecraft, were also RSDO procurements.

Related Links
Earth Observation News - Suppiliers, Technology and Application




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
CIRA Scientist Among Authors Of Book Celebrating 50 Years Of Earth Observations From Space
Fort Collins CO (SPX) Feb 19, 2008
Stan Kidder, a researcher at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at Colorado State University, has contributed to a new book celebrating 50 years of Earth observations from space. He is one of a dozen scientists from around the country who have written chapters in the book "Earth Observations from Space: The First 50 Years of Scientific Achievements."

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • HP And Qualcomm To Deliver Options For Worldwide Internet Access
  • Google's Android debuts in Barcelona
  • Nokia says to launch touch-screen phone in late '08
  • Lenovo pitching PCs to wider French market

  • Arianespace Mission Update: The ATV Has Been Integrated On Its Ariane 5 Launcher
  • ILS Proton Launches THOR 5 Satellite
  • Bigelow Aerospace And Lockheed Martin Converging On Terms For Launch Services
  • USAF Awards United Launch Alliance Three Delta IV Missions

  • NASA opens a rotary wing research project
  • All-star line-up at first Singapore Airshow
  • Military Aircraft To Perform Aviation Safety Research
  • Birds Bats And Insects Hold Secrets For Aerospace Engineers

  • EADS DS Delivers Army Command And Control Information System To Franco-German Brigade
  • Thompson Files: Electronic war blindness
  • Harris Provides American Forces Network With Broadcast System To Reach One Million Troops
  • Raytheon Wins Air Force Satellite Communications Contract

  • The power of healing: damaged rubber repairs itself
  • It's Raining Satellites
  • NASA MidSTAR-1 Successful Technologies May Be Revolutionary
  • Expert: AI computers by 2020

  • Michael Larkin Appointed Executive Vice President Of Orbital's Satellite Business Unit
  • Boeing Integrated Defense Systems Looks To Future With Leadership Changes
  • Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems Names Carey VP For ISR Systems
  • NASA Selects Jaiwon Shin To Head Aeronautics Research

  • NASA Extends Mission For Ball Aerospace-Built ICESat
  • CIRA Scientist Among Authors Of Book Celebrating 50 Years Of Earth Observations From Space
  • Indonesia To Develop New EO Satellite
  • Russia To Launch Space Project To Monitor The Arctic In 2010

  • Introducing The ProMark 500 Multi-Constellation GNSS RTK Receiver
  • College Student's Mobile Phones Become Lifelines To Campus Police
  • RF NEULINK Receives Contract To Support US Marine's IGRS Program
  • BrickHouse Security Reports Record Growth In Sales of GPS Tracking Devices To Police

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright Space.TV Corporation. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space.TV Corp on any Web page published or hosted by Space.TV Corp. Privacy Statement