Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Mathematicians can conjure matter waves inside an invisible hat
by Staff Writers
Seattle WA (SPX) May 31, 2012


This graphic shows a matter wave hitting a Schrodinger's hat. The wave inside the container is magnified. Outside, the waves wrap as if they had never encountered any obstacle. Credit: G. Uhlmann, U. of Washington.

Invisibility, once the subject of magic or legend, is slowly becoming reality. Over the past five years mathematicians and other scientists have been working on devices that enable invisibility cloaks - perhaps not yet concealing Harry Potter, but at least shielding small objects from detection by microwaves or sound waves.

A University of Washington mathematician is part of an international team working to understand invisibility and extend its possible applications. The group has now devised an amplifier that can boost light, sound or other waves while hiding them inside an invisible container.

"You can isolate and magnify what you want to see, and make the rest invisible," said corresponding author Gunther Uhlmann, a UW mathematics professor. "You can amplify the waves tremendously. And although the wave has been magnified a lot, you still cannot see what is happening inside the container."

The findings were published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

As a first application, the researchers propose manipulating matter waves, which are the mathematical description of particles in quantum mechanics. The researchers envision building a quantum microscope that could capture quantum waves, the waves of the nanoworld. A quantum microscope could, for example, be used to monitor electronic processes on computer chips.

The authors dubbed their system "Schrodinger's hat," referring to the famed Schrodinger's cat in quantum mechanics. The name is also a nod to the ability to create something from what appears to be nothing.

"In some sense you are doing something magical, because it looks like a particle is being created. It's like pulling something out of your hat," Uhlmann said.

Matter waves inside the hat can also be shrunk, though Uhlmann notes that concealing very small objects "is not so interesting."

Uhlmann, who is on leave at the University of California, Irvine, has been working on invisibility with fellow mathematicians Allan Greenleaf at the University of Rochester, Yaroslav Kurylev at University College London in the U.K., and Matti Lassas at the University of Helsinki in Finland, all of whom are co-authors on the new paper.

The team helped develop the original mathematics to formulate cloaks, which must be realized using a class of engineered materials, dubbed metamaterials, that bend waves so that it appears as if there was no object in their path. The international team in 2007 devised wormholes in which waves disappear in one place and pop up somewhere else.

For this paper, they teamed up with co-author Ulf Leonhardt, a physicist at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and author on one of the first papers on invisibility.

Recent progress suggests that a Schrodinger's hat could, in fact, be built for some types of waves.

"From the experimental point of view, I think the most exciting thing is how easy it seems to be to build materials for acoustic cloaking," Uhlmann said.

Wavelengths for microwave, sound and quantum matter waves are longer than light or electromagnetic waves, making it easier to build the materials to cloak objects from observation using these phenomena.

"We hope that it's feasible, but in science you don't know until you do it," Uhlmann said. Now that the paper is published, they hope to find collaborators to build a prototype.

.


Related Links
University of Washington
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
VTT researcher finds explanation for friction
Helsinki, Finland (SPX) May 31, 2012
Friction is a key phenomenon in applied physics, whose origin has been studied for centuries. Until now, it has been understood that mechanical wear-resistance and fluid lubrication affect friction, but the fundamental origin of sliding friction has been unknown. Dr. Lasse Makkonen, Principal Scientist at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, has now presented an explanation for the or ... read more


TECH SPACE
Short movies stored in an atomic vapor

Oracle aims to dethrone IBM in business hardware

Mathematicians can conjure matter waves inside an invisible hat

VTT researcher finds explanation for friction

TECH SPACE
New Mobile Antenna from ASC Signal Designed For Rapid Deployment by Defense and Commercial Users

Researchers Improve Fast-Moving Mobile Networks

Second AEHF Military Communications Satellite Launched

Fourth Boeing-built WGS Satellite Accepted by USAF

TECH SPACE
SpaceX Dragon capsule splash lands in Pacific

US cargo ship on return voyage from space station

US cargo vessel prepares to leave space station

Once Upon a Time

TECH SPACE
Lockheed Martin Completes Navigation Payload Milestone For GPS III Prototype

TomTom eyes expanding S. American market

Spirent Launches New Entry-Level Multi-GNSS Simulator

Beidou navigation system installed on more Chinese fishing boats

TECH SPACE
Louis Gallois hands EADS reins to Tom Enders

Boeing Delivers First EA-18G Growler Featuring Bharat Electronics Limited Cockpit Subassembly

Flapping protective wings increase lift

Russia, India to produce transports

TECH SPACE
The first chemical circuit developed

Copper-nickel nanowires could be perfect fit for printable electronics

Japan's Renesas ups chip outsourcing to Taiwan giant

New silicon memory chip developed

TECH SPACE
CryoSat goes to sea

S Korea to develop geostationary satellite for environmental monitoring

LiDAR Technology Reveals Faults Near Lake Tahoe

Satellite maps ocean floor

TECH SPACE
EU threatens Italy with court action over Rome trash

Fears as Latin America's largest trash dump closes

Ship's captain jailed over New Zealand oil spill

Germany, India in talks over treating Bhopal waste




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement