Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Japan court rejects patent claims against Samsung as Apple files More US actions
by Staff Writers
Tokyo (AFP) Aug 31, 2012


Tokyo court rejects Apple patent claim against Samsung
Tokyo (AFP) Aug 31, 2012 - A Japanese court Friday rejected Apple's claim that South Korean rival Samsung stole the US firm's technology for its own products, the latest ruling in a global patent battle between the tech giants.

The Tokyo District Court ruled that Samsung did not infringe on Apple's patents on its iPhone and iPad computer for some of its own Galaxy smartphones and tablet computer.

The three-judge panel also awarded legal costs to Samsung.

"The defendant's products do not seem like they used the same technology as the plaintiff's products so we turn down the complaints made by (Apple)," Judge Tamotsu Shoji told the court.

The decision comes a week after the iPhone maker won more than $1.0 billion in a massive US court victory over Samsung with jurors finding that the South Korean firm had "willfully" infringed on Apple's patents.

Apple was seeking 100 million yen ($1.27 million) in compensation from Samsung's Japanese units, and had accused it of stealing technology used to transfer music and video files.

Samsung has steadfastly denied its rival's claims in a string of similar cases filed across the globe.

The high-profile verdict in the United States last week affects patents on a range of Samsung products including some of its popular smartphones and its Galaxy 10 tablet.

Jurors rejected the South Korean electronics firm's patent theft counterclaims against Apple.

Samsung has pledged to keep fighting the case, and said that if it stands "it will lead to fewer choices, less innovation, and potentially higher prices".

A Japanese court Friday rejected Apple's claim that Samsung stole its technology, dealing a blow to the iPhone maker which last week won more than $1 billion in damages in the US from its bitter rival.

The ruling by the Tokyo District Court is the latest chapter in a long-running global patent war between the smartphone giants which have accused each other of stealing intellectual property for their own products.

The Japanese court found that the South Korean firm did not infringe Apple's iPhone and iPad patents for some of its own Galaxy smartphones and tablet computer. The three-judge panel also awarded legal costs to Samsung.

"The defendant's products do not seem like they used the same technology as the plaintiff's products so we turn down the complaints made by (Apple)," Judge Tamotsu Shoji told the court.

Apple had sought damages and to block sales of some Samsung products in Japan, where both firms have seen their popularity rise in a market traditionally dominated by domestic giants such as Sharp and Sony.

As well as dealing a blow to the US firm, the ruling will help Samsung pick itself up after the defeat in the United States, analysts said.

Samsung shares closed 1.48 percent higher in Seoul on Friday.

"Investors were encouraged by the ruling in Tokyo... it eased concern over Samsung's future which had been raised by the defeat in the US court battle," said Seo Won-Seok, analyst at Korea Investment Securities.

Samsung, which has steadfastly denied its rival's claims in a string of similar cases filed across the globe, hailed the Tokyo court's ruling.

"We welcome the court's decision, which confirmed our long-held position that our products do not infringe Apple's intellectual property," it said in a statement.

A Japan-based spokesman for Apple, which can appeal the verdict, declined to comment.

Last week the iPhone maker won $1.05 billion in a massive US court victory over Samsung with jurors finding that the South Korean firm had "willfully" infringed on Apple's patents.

The Japanese case, which focused on Apple's claim that Samsung stole technology used to transfer music and video files, sought a comparatively small amount -- 100 million yen ($1.27 million) -- in damages.

"It was a ruling on just one technology so it is difficult to draw any conclusion on its overall impact," said Michiru Takahashi, a patent lawyer at Jones Day in Tokyo.

"But... if Samsung had lost again it would have considerably hurt its image."

Samsung and Apple are reportedly fighting patent cases in at least 10 countries.

The high-profile verdict in the United States last week regarded patents on a range of Samsung products including some of its popular smartphones and its Galaxy 10 tablet.

Jurors rejected the South Korean electronics firm's patent theft counterclaims against Apple.

Also last week, a court in Seoul ruled the pair swiped each other's technology, ordering Apple to pay damages of 40 million won ($35,000) while saying Samsung must pay its rival 25 million won for violating one of Apple's patents.

Each company had sought damages of 100 million won.

The South Korean court said there was "no possibility" that consumers would confuse Samsung and Apple smartphones -- a key issue in the US trial -- and that Samsung's smartphone icons do not infringe Apple's patents.

But it said Samsung infringed Apple's patent for bounce-back technology, a widely copied spring-back action when users reach the edge of a document.

The court imposed a partial ban on both firms' product sales.

The patent cases come as Apple loses ground to rivals including Samsung that use the Android operating system developed by Google.

Samsung shipped 50.2 million smartphones globally between April and June, while Apple sold 26 million iPhones, according to research firm IDC.

The Asian firm held 32.6 percent market share compared to 16.9 percent for Apple, which has a roughly 70-percent share of the global tablet market.

.


Related Links
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Nanoresonators might improve cell phone performance
West Lafayette IN (SPX) Aug 31, 2012
Researchers have learned how to mass produce tiny mechanical devices that could help cell phone users avoid the nuisance of dropped calls and slow downloads. The devices are designed to ease congestion over the airwaves to improve the performance of cell phones and other portable devices. "There is not enough radio spectrum to account for everybody's handheld portable device," said Jeffrey Rhoad ... read more


TECH SPACE
Nanoresonators might improve cell phone performance

Japan court rejects patent claims against Samsung as Apple files More US actions

ThalesRaytheonSystems awarded contract by US Army to upgrade Firefinder Radars

Stable isotopes a universal tool

TECH SPACE
Smartphone App Can Track Objects On the Battlefield as Well as On the Sports Field

Lockheed Martin Wins Role on Defense Information Systems Agency Program

Raytheon unveils cross domain strategy to securely access information via mobile devices

NATO Special Forces Taps Mutualink for Global Cross Coalition Communications

TECH SPACE
First-Stage Fuel Loaded; Launch Weather Forecast Improves

NASA launches mission to explore radiation belts

ISRO to score 100 with a cooperative mission Sep 9

NASA Administrator Announces New Commercial Crew And Cargo Milestones

TECH SPACE
CTrack Launches Lone Worker Device To Boost Protection And Peace Of Mind

Spirent Redefines Leadership in Location Testing with Solution for Hybrid Location Technology

Robbers nabbed thanks to GPS phone in loot

Fourth Galileo satellite reaches French Guiana launch site

TECH SPACE
Boeing to Provide PBL for USAF F-15 Radars

Northrop Grumman's BACN Completes 3,000th E-11A Mission Overseas

Boeing Fatigue Test to Validate Predicted Life of B-1 Bomber Fleet

US Army Apache Fleet Surpasses 3.5 Million Flight Hours

TECH SPACE
Researchers measure photonic interactions at the atomic level

Wayne State's new flexible electronics technology may lead to new medical uses

Magnetic Vortex Reveals Key to Spintronic Speed Limit

Electronic Nose Prototype Developed

TECH SPACE
Proba-2's espresso-cup microcamera snaps Hurricane Isaac

$3.7 Billion Reasons Why GIS Technology is The Future

Landsat Data Continuity Mission Environmental Testing is Underway

Expert Analysis of Energy Infrastructure Using HiRes Satellite Imagery

TECH SPACE
Wind concentrates pollutants with unexpected order in an urban environment

China wrestles with acid rain threat

Earthworms soak up heavy metal

Italians protest against pollution from steelworks




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement