Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




CHIP TECH
Improving Electronics by Solving Nearly Century-old Problem
by Sean Nealon for UCR News
Riverside CA (SPX) Mar 11, 2013


Alexander Balandin, a professor electrical engineering at UC Riverside.

A University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering professor and a team of researchers published a paper that shows how they solved an almost century-old problem that could further help downscale the size of electronic devices.

The work, led by Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering at UC Riverside, focused on the low-frequency electronic 1/f noise, also known as pink noise and flicker noise.

It is a signal or process with a power spectral density inversely proportional to the frequency. It was first discovered in vacuum tubes in 1925 and since then it has been found everywhere from fluctuations of the intensity in music recordings to human heart rates and electrical currents in materials and devices.

The importance of this noise for electronics motivated numerous studies of its physical origin and methods for its control. For example, the signal's phase noise in a radar or communication gadget such as smart phone is determined, to a large degree, by the 1/f noise level in the transistors used inside the radar or smart phone.

However, after almost a century of investigations, the origin of 1/f noise in most of material systems remained a mystery. A question of particular importance for electronics was whether 1/f noise was generated on the surface of electrical conductors or inside their volumes.

A team of researchers from the UC Riverside, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of The Russian Academy of Sciences were able to shed light on 1/f noise origin using a set of multi-layered graphene samples with the thickness continuously varied from around 15 atomic planes to a single layer of graphene.

Graphene is a single-atom thick carbon crystal with unique properties, including superior electrical and heat conductivity, mechanical strength and unique optical absorption.

In addition to Balandin, who is also the founding chair of the materials science and engineering program at UC Riverside, the team of researchers included: The team included: Guanxiong Liu, a research associate in Balandin's Nano-Device Laboratory (NDL); Michael S. Shur, Patricia W. and C. Sheldon Roberts Professor of Solid State Electronics at RPI; and Sergey Rumyantsev, research professor at RPI and Ioffe Institute.

"The key to this interesting result was that unlike in metal or semiconductor films, the thickness of graphene multilayers can be continuously and uniformly varied all the way down to a single atomic layer of graphene - the ultimate "surface" of the film," Balandin said. "Thus, we were able to accomplish with multilayer graphene films something that researchers could not do with metal films in the last century. We probed the origin of 1/f noise directly."

He added that previous studies could not test metal films to the thicknesses below about eight nanometers. The thickness of graphene is 0.35 nanometers and can be increased gradually, one atomic plane at a time.

"Apart from the fundamental science, the reported results are important for continuing the downscaling of conventional electronic devices," Balandin said. "Current technology is already at the level when many devices become essentially the surfaces. In this sense, the finding goes beyond graphene field."

He also noted that the study was essential for the proposed applications of graphene in analog circuits, communications and sensors. This is because all these applications require acceptably low levels of 1/f noise, which contributes to the phase noise of communication systems and limits sensor sensitivity and selectivity.

The results of the research have been published in the journal Applied Physics Letters. The paper, "Origin of 1/f Noise in Graphene Multilayers: Surface vs. Volume" is available here.

The research at UC Riverside was supported, in part, by the Semiconductor Research Corporation and Defense Advanced Research Project Agency through Center for Function Accelerated nanoMaterial Engineering and by the National Science Foundation. The work at RPI was supported by the US NSF under the auspices of I/UCRC "CONNECTION ONE" at RPI and by the NSF EAGER program.

.


Related Links
Riverside Bourns College of Engineering
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





CHIP TECH
First discovery of a natural topological insulator
Washington DC (SPX) Mar 08, 2013
In a step toward understanding and exploiting an exotic form of matter that has been sparking excitement for potential applications in a new genre of supercomputers, scientists are reporting the first identification of a naturally occurring "topological insulator" (TI). Their report on discovery of the material, retrieved from an abandoned gold mine in the Czech Republic, appears in the AC ... read more


CHIP TECH
Activists fault WHO report on Fukushima radiation

SimCity climbing from launch wreckage

INRS overcomes a hurdle in the development of terahertz lasers

SSBV And zero2infinity Team Up For Airdrop Recovery

CHIP TECH
INTEROP-7000 uses ISSI to link IP-based voice comms with legacy radio

Space race under way to create quantum satellite

Boeing Receives USAF Contract for Integrated C4ISR Targeting Solution

Air Operations Center Modernization Program PDR Completed

CHIP TECH
Vega launcher integration continues for its April mission

SpaceX's capsule arrives at ISS

Dragon Transporting Two ISS Experiments For AMES

SpaceX Optimistic Despite Dragon Capsule Mishap

CHIP TECH
China targeting navigation system's global coverage by 2020

Russian GLONASS space satellite group again at full strength

Tracking trains with satellite precision

USAF Awards Lockheed Martin Contracts to Begin Work on Next Set of GPS III Satellites

CHIP TECH
Beechcraft fights defense Embraer contract

Upgraded early warning aircraft arrive in Taiwan

Study Shows How One Insect Got Its Wings

Second F-35 For The Netherlands Rolls Out Of F-35 Production Facility

CHIP TECH
Improving Electronics by Solving Nearly Century-old Problem

UCSB physicists make discovery in the quantum realm

First discovery of a natural topological insulator

Polymer capacitor dazzles flash manufacturer

CHIP TECH
Japan's huge quake heard from space: study

Space station to watch for Earth disasters

Twin CU-Boulder instruments reveal a third radiation belt can wrap around Earth

Mysterious electron stash found hidden among Van Allen belts

CHIP TECH
Dead pigs contaminating Chinese river?

Toxic gas leak in South Korea, 11 hospitalised

Japan warns about smog drifting from China

Electronic waste recycling on the increase




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement