Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Green photon beams more agile than optical tweezers
by Staff Writers
Heidelberg, Germany (SPX) Sep 22, 2013


File image.

Romanian scientists have discovered a novel approach for the optical manipulation of macromolecules and biological cells.

Their findings, published in EPJ B, stem from challenging the idea that visible light would induce no physical effect on them since it is not absorbed. Instead, Sorin Comorosan, working as a physicist at the National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering based in Magurele, Romania, and as a biologist at the Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania, and colleagues, had the idea to use green photon beams.

With them, it is possible to perform optical manipulation of macrostructures, such as biological proteins, with greater precision than with optical tweezers made from focused laser beams.

The authors used what are known as high-density green photon beams (HDGP). These are capable of inducing a polarisation effect, separating the positive from the negative charges within complex macrostructures.

As a result, the polarised structures interact with an external electromagnetic field and with one another. The authors experimented with long carbon chains, which represent the framework of biological macromolecules. They then used a range of physical techniques to reveal the locally induced molecular arrangements.

Comorosan and colleagues found that the effect of the beam leads to a type of matter called 'biological optical matter.' It includes newly organised material structures, such as molecular aggregates and micro-particles, and can feature new characteristics such as antioxidant properties.

The authors realised that this approach covers a larger area than focused tweezers and is capable of organising so-called mesoscopic matter-ranging from the nano to the micrometric scale- into a new 3D molecular architecture.

They then performed numerical calculations on a physical model they developed to compute the interacting force between polarisable bodies. Further study of the interaction of these polarised proteins with the body's unpolarised proteins could have far-reaching applications in immunology, genetics and epigenetics.

S. Comorosan et al., (2013), Optical manipulation of complex molecular systems by high density green photons: experimental and theoretical evidence, European Physical Journal B 86: 232, DOI 10.1140/epjb/e2013-40049-8

.


Related Links
Springer
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
First laser-like X-ray light from a solid
Hamburg, Germany (SPX) Sep 09, 2013
Researchers have for the first time created an X-ray laser based on a solid. The method developed at DESY's free-electron laser FLASH opens up new avenues of investigation in materials research, as reported by the team of Prof. Alexander Fohlisch of the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) in the British scientific journal "Nature." "This technology makes it possible to analyse sensitive samples ... read more


TECH SPACE
Green photon beams more agile than optical tweezers

Space oddity: the mystery of 2013 QW1

Domain walls as new information storage medium

Invention jet prints nanostructures with self-assembling material

TECH SPACE
Third Advanced EHF Satellite Will Enhance Resiliency of Military Communications

USAF Launches Third Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite

Atlas 5 Lofts 3rd AEHF Military Comms Satellites

Unified Military Intelligence Picture Helping to Dispel the Fog of War

TECH SPACE
Arianespace and Astrium sign deal to begin production of 18 new Ariane 5 vehicles

Problems with Proton booster fixed

Decontamination continues at Baikonur after Proton abortive launc

Russia launches three communication satellites

TECH SPACE
Astrium down selected for MOJ electronic tagging contract

Lockheed Martin GPS 3 Satellite Prototype Integrated With Raytheon OCX Ground Control Segment

China's navi-location industries to boom: white paper

OHN Christner Trucking Selects Orbcomm For Refrigerated Telematics Solution

TECH SPACE
Airbus nets 68 A320 orders in China as market grows

Airbus, Boeing project commercial aviation needs

Boeing to cut C-17 production jobs

EU urges global deal on airline pollution

TECH SPACE
Graphene Photodetector Integrated into Computer Chip

On the Road to Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computing

Dow Jones to part with tech news site AllThingsD

The '50-50' chip: Memory device of the future?

TECH SPACE
Ultra-fast Electrons Explain Third Radiation Ring Around Earth

Preparing to launch Swarm

ESA's GOCE mission to end this year

NASA Launches Study of New Global Land Imaging System

TECH SPACE
Chile ruling to keep Barrick mine closed to late 2014

Legacy Soil Pollution Higher lead levels may lie just below surface

PNG makes BHP liable for environmental damage from mine

Throw away replaces take away for Danish restaurant




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement