Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Experts row over 'earliest' Chinese inscriptions find
by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) July 12, 2013


Symbols on ax pieces in China may be world's oldest writing
Shanghai, China (UPI) Jul 11, 2013 - Fragments of two ancient stone axes found in China bear what could be some of the world's earliest primitive writing, archaeologists say.

Discovered as part of a large find of artifacts unearthed south of Shanghai, the ax fragments have been dated at around 5,000 years old, the BBC reported Thursday.

Currently, evidence of the world's oldest writing is thought to be from Mesopotamia from 3,300 B.C.

There has been disagreement among Chinese experts whether the markings on the axes are actual writing or a less sophisticated grouping of symbols.

"The main thing is that there are six symbols arranged together and three of them are the same," lead archaeologist Xu Xinmin said. "This clearly is a sentence expressing some kind of meaning."

Cao Jinyan, a Chinese scholar who is an expert on ancient writing, agreed.

"Although we cannot yet accurately read the meaning of the 'words' carved on the stone axes, we can be certain that they belong to the category of words, even if they are somewhat primitive," he said.

Fierce debate has erupted among experts in China over the discovery of 5,000-year-old inscriptions that some believe represent the earliest record of Chinese characters.

Pottery pieces and stone vessels unearthed at the Zhuangqiaofen archaeological site in the eastern province of Zhejiang push "the origin of the written language back 1,000 years", the state-run Global Times newspaper reported.

The inscriptions predate the oracles, writings on turtle shells dating back to the Shang Dynasty (C.1600-1046BC), which are commonly believed to be the origin of the written Chinese language system.

Some of the inscriptions were written together in what some experts believe resembles a short sentence.

Li Boqian, an archaeology professor from Peking University, said the symbols reveal the ancient Liangzhu civilisation -- which existed in Zhejiang and neighbouring Jiangsu in the Neolithic Age -- had already developed the basic structure of sentences from independent words, the Global Times said earlier this week.

Other specialists dismissed the significance of such a find. Xu Hong, an archaeology researcher from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, expressed scepticism on links between the inscriptions and the development of Chinese script.

"Even if those signs on the stones were characters, they were simply from a long dead east Asian country before the Middle Kingdom existed," he said on Sina Weibo, China's version of the social network Twitter.

"Many signs and character lookalikes earlier than the oracles have been found in east Asia."

Xia Jingchun, a professor of Chinese language from Beijing Technology and Business University, also wrote on Weibo: "It's long been believed by experts that there were more ancient characters than the oracles, because the oracles were too mature, and older languages are supposed to be less developed."

The inscriptions were found among artefacts unearthed between 2003 and 2006, state media said.

.


Related Links
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Silicon oxide memories transcend a hurdle
Houston TX (SPX) Jul 11, 2013
A Rice University laboratory pioneering memory devices that use cheap, plentiful silicon oxide to store data has pushed them a step further with chips that show the technology's practicality. The team led by Rice chemist James Tour has built a 1-kilobit rewritable silicon oxide device with diodes that eliminate data-corrupting crosstalk. A paper on the new work appears this week in the jou ... read more


TECH SPACE
Experts row over 'earliest' Chinese inscriptions find

Designer droplets open new possibilities

Silicon oxide memories transcend a hurdle

Researchers Build 3-D Structures Out of Liquid Metal

TECH SPACE
Northrop Grumman Moves New B-2 Satellite Communications Concept to the High Ground

Canada links up on secure U.S. military telecoms network

Lockheed Martin-Built MUOS Satellite Encapsulated In Launch Vehicle Payload Fairing

Northrop Grumman, MILSATCOM Conduct Preliminary Design Review of Enhanced Polar System Control and Planning Segment

TECH SPACE
Special group to be set up for inspecting production of Proton-M carrier rockets

Two Rockets Launched From Wallops

Specialists unrelated to Khrunichev to check Proton-M rocket production

Proton Rocket to Stay in Demand Despite Accidents

TECH SPACE
Tests advance U.S. program for new GPS satellites

Russia to launch 2 Glonass satellites

GPS maker Garmin unveils heads-up traffic display for cars

Indian GPS satellite orbit to be raised on Tuesday night

TECH SPACE
Russian air force receives Su-34 bombers

Poseidon full-rate production closer

China anxiously awaits updates after Asiana jet crash

Canada, China to boost air links as accord reached

TECH SPACE
New analytical methodology can guide electrode optimization

TU Vienna develops light transistor

Solving electron transfer

Microscopy technique could help computer industry develop 3-D components

TECH SPACE
Google ditches location-sharing feature in map apps

Google updates Map app with new traffic, exploration functions

Long-lived oceanography satellite decommissioned after equipment fails

Images From New Space Station Camera Help U.S. Neighbor to the North

TECH SPACE
Less haze in Singapore as the cause becomes clearer and more complex

Harvard researchers warn of legacy mercury in the environment

Noise and the city - Hong Kong's struggle for quiet

Air pollution boosts lung, heart risks: studies




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement