Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Diagnosis just a breath away with new laser
by Staff Writers
Adelaide, Australia (SPX) Feb 12, 2014


File image.

University of Adelaide physics researchers have developed a new type of laser that will enable exciting new advances in areas as diverse as breath analysis for disease diagnosis and remote sensing of critical greenhouse gases.

Published in the journal Optics Letters, the researchers from the University's Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing and the School of Chemistry and Physics describe how they have been able to produce 25 times more light emission than other lasers operating at a similar wavelength - opening the way for detection of very low concentrations of gases.

"This laser has significantly more power and is much more efficient than other lasers operating in this frequency range," says Ori Henderson-Sapir, PhD researcher. "Using a novel approach, we've been able to overcome the significant technical hurdles that have prevented fibre lasers from producing sufficient power in the mid-infrared."

The new laser operates in the mid-infrared frequency range - the same wavelength band where many important hydrocarbon gases absorb light.

"Probing this region of the electromagnetic spectrum, with the high power we've achieved, means we will be able to detect these gases with a high degree of sensitivity," says Project Leader Dr David Ottaway. "For instance, it should enable the possibility of analysing trace gases in exhaled breath in the doctors' surgery."

Research has shown that with various diseases, minute amounts of gases not normally exhaled can be detected in the breath; for example, acetone can be detected in the breath when someone has diabetes.

Other potential applications include detection in the atmosphere of methane and ethane which are important gases in global warming.

"The main limitation to date with laser detection of these gases has been the lack of suitable light sources that can produce enough energy in this part of the spectrum," says Dr Ottaway. "The few available sources are generally expensive and bulky and, therefore, not suitable for widespread use."

The new laser uses an optical fibre which is easier to work with, less bulky and more portable, and much more cost effective to produce than other types of laser.

The researchers, who also include Jesper Munch, Emeritus Professor of Experimental Physics, reported light emission at 3.6 microns - the deepest mid-infrared emission from a fibre laser operating at room temperature. They have also shown that the laser has the promise of efficient emission across a large wavelength spectrum from 3.3-3.8 micron.

"This means it has incredible potential for scanning for a range of gases with a high level of sensitivity, with great promise as a very useful diagnostic and sensing tool," says Dr Ottaway.

.


Related Links
University of Adelaide
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Towards perfect control of light waves
Garching, Germany (SPX) Jan 17, 2014
A team at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP) in Garching (Germany) has constructed a detector, which provides a detailed picture of the waveforms of femtosecond laser pulses (1 fs = 10-15 seconds). Knowledge of the exact waveform of these pulses enables scientists to reproducibly generate light flashes that are a thousand times shorter - lasting only for attoseconds - and can be used to ... read more


TECH SPACE
Scientists use 'voting' and 'penalties' to overcome quantum errors

From Stone Age to Space Age: bone pigment helps probe

Diagnosis just a breath away with new laser

Data links quick fix

TECH SPACE
US Marines Reach Milestone For New General Dynamics-built Aviation CCS

MUOS Satellite Tests Show Extensive Reach In Polar Communications Capability

Space squadron optimizes wideband communication constellations

GA-ASI and Northrop Showcase Unmanned Electronic Attack Capabilities

TECH SPACE
Russia-Kazakhstan Working Group to Report on Proton Launches

Russian Telecoms Satellites Readied for March Launch

Ariane 5's heavy-lift mission is an on the numbers launch success

Antrix to launch UK and Singapore satellite using India's Polar Satellite Launcher

TECH SPACE
Galileo works, and works well

GAGAN System reaches certification milestone in India

Lockheed Martin Powers On Second GPS 3 Satellite In Production

India to launch three navigation satellites this year

TECH SPACE
Planetary Scientists Get Into Balloon Game

Lockheed Martin Files For FAA Type Design Update

Iraq seeks U.S. air traffic control system as air force grows

Black box found as Algeria seeks cause of deadly plane crash

TECH SPACE
New way to measure electron pair interactions

New Research Leads To Multifunctional Spintronic Smart Sensors

Ballistic transport in graphene suggests new type of electronic device

Stirring-up atomtronics in a quantum circuit

TECH SPACE
Olympics: Eye in the sky give viewers dramatic new angle

NASA-USGS Landsat 8 Satellite Celebrates First Year of Success

Largest Flock of Earth-Imaging Satellites Launch into Orbit From ISS

Swarm heads for new heights

TECH SPACE
Tuna study reveals oil pollution causes heart problems

S. Korea fisheries minister sacked over oil spill

France to start pumping out Spanish ship broken in three

Cooperative SO2 and NOx aerosol formation in haze pollution




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement