Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Dense hydrogen in a new light
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Jun 05, 2013


File image.

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. The way it responds under extreme pressures and temperatures is crucial to our understanding of matter and the nature of hydrogen-rich planets.

New work from Carnegie scientists using intense infrared radiation shines new light on this fundamental material at extreme pressures and reveals the details of a surprising new form of solid hydrogen.

Under normal conditions hydrogen is a gas consisting of diatomic molecules. The hydrogen molecules start to change as the pressure increases. These different forms are called phases and hydrogen has three known solid ones.

It has been speculated that at high pressures hydrogen even transforms to a metal, which means it conducts electricity. It could even become a superconductor or a superfluid that never freezes-a completely new and exotic state of matter.

In a new paper published in Physical Review Letters, a team from Carnegie's Geophysical Laboratory examined the structure, bonding and electronic properties of highly compressed hydrogen using intense infrared radiation.

Using a facility maintained by the Geophysical Laboratory at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the team found the new form to be stable from about 2.2 million times normal atmospheric pressure and about 80 degrees Fahrenheit to at least 3.4 million times atmospheric pressure and about -100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Their experiments revealed that hydrogen takes a form under these conditions that differs remarkably from its other known structures. The new phase has two very different types of hydrogen molecules in its structure.

One type of molecule interacts very weakly with its neighboring molecules - unusual for molecules under this type of very high compression. The other type of molecule bonds with its neighbors, forming surprising planar sheets.

The measurements also show that solid hydrogen under these conditions is on the borderline between a semiconductor, like silicon, and a semimetal, like graphite. The results disprove earlier claims that hydrogen forms a dense atomic metal at these pressures and temperatures.

"This simple element-with only one electron and one proton-continues to surprise us with its richness and complexity when it is subjected to high pressures," Russell Hemley, Director of the Geophysical Laboratory, said. "The results provide an important testing ground for fundamental theory."

.


Related Links
Carnegie Institution
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Atom by atom, bond by bond, a chemical reaction caught in the act
Berkeley CA (SPX) Jun 04, 2013
When Felix Fischer of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) set out to develop nanostructures made of graphene using a new, controlled approach to chemical reactions, the first result was a surprise: spectacular images of individual carbon atoms and the bonds between them. "We weren't thinking about making beautiful images; the reactions thems ... read more


TECH SPACE
Atom by atom, bond by bond, a chemical reaction caught in the act

Dense hydrogen in a new light

Another American High Frontier First: 3-D Manufacturing in Space

Charred micro-bunny sculpture shows promise of new material for 3-D shaping

TECH SPACE
Mutualink Platform to be Deployed by US DoD during JUICE 2013

General Dynamics to Deliver U.S. Army's Newest Tactical Ground Station Intelligence System

Boeing-built WGS-5 Satellite Enhances Tactical Communications for Warfighters

US Navy And Lockheed Martin Deliver Secure Communications Satellite For Mobile Users

TECH SPACE
The Future of Space Launch

Rocket Engine Maker Proton-PM to Invest in New Products

Russia Launches European Telecoms Satellite

Ariane poised to launch first 20 ton payload into orbit

TECH SPACE
Glitch puts off Indian navigation satellite launch by a fortnight

Orbcomm And Cartrack Deliver Telematics Solution For African Market

Narayansami Inaugurates ISRO Navigation Centre

Advanced aircraft detection to prevent 'friendly fire' mishaps

TECH SPACE
Shun Tak Holdings buys a third of Jetstar Hong Kong

Airline industry calls for single emissions standard

Boeing's first 787 arrives in China: media

Slow progress on Unasur plans for a joint trainer aircraf

TECH SPACE
Printing innovations provide 10-fold improvement in organic electronics

Intel hopes new processors can kick-start ailing PC market

Intel introduces fourth generation processors

Milwaukee-York researchers forward quest for quantum computing

TECH SPACE
New maps show how shipping noise spans the globe

Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission Team Assemble Flight Observatory

Elevated carbon dioxide making arid regions greener

Landsat 8 Satellite Begins Watch

TECH SPACE
Urban Indians grow concerned about pollution: survey

Microplastic pollution prevalent in lakes too

Fresh oil spill from Turkish tanker off Cape Town

Poland dumps old garbage system for greener setup




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement