. Space Industry and Business News .

Cotton fabric cleans itself when exposed to ordinary sunlight
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Dec 19, 2011

File image.

Imagine jeans, sweats or socks that clean and de-odorize themselves when hung on a clothesline in the sun or draped on a balcony railing. Scientists are reporting development of a new cotton fabric that does clean itself of stains and bacteria when exposed to ordinary sunlight. Their report appears in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Mingce Long and Deyong Wu say their fabric uses a coating made from a compound of titanium dioxide, the white material used in everything from white paint to foods to sunscreen lotions.

Titanium dioxide breaks down dirt and kills microbes when exposed to some types of light. It already has found uses in self-cleaning windows, kitchen and bathroom tiles, odor-free socks and other products.

Self-cleaning cotton fabrics have been made in the past, the authors note, but they self-clean thoroughly only when exposed to ultraviolet rays. So they set out to develop a new cotton fabric that cleans itself when exposed to ordinary sunlight.

Their report describes cotton fabric coated with nanoparticles made from a compound of titanium dioxide and nitrogen. They show that fabric coated with the material removes an orange dye stain when exposed to sunlight.

Further dispersing nanoparticles composed of silver and iodine accelerates the discoloration process. The coating remains intact after washing and drying.

Related Links
American Chemical Society
Space Technology News - Applications and Research

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Researchers explain granular material properties
Waltham, MA (SPX) Dec 16, 2011
A stroll on the beach can mean sinking your toes into smooth sand or walking firm-footed on a surface that appears almost solid. While both properties are commonplace, exactly what it is that makes granular materials change from a flowing state to a "jammed," or solid, state? Whether it's sand on a beach or rice grains in a hopper, being able to predict the behavior of granular matter can ... read more

Apple scores hit on HTC in US patent case

Tool enables scientists to uncover patterns in vast data sets

Samsung files new claims against Apple in Germany

Cotton fabric cleans itself when exposed to ordinary sunlight

Satellite Tracking Specialist, Track24, wins Canadian Government Contract

Airman brings space to ground forces

Astrium achieves Initial System Acceptance on Yahsat programme

Northrop Grumman Awarded Microscale Power Conversion Contract

Orbital Selects Antares as Permanent Name For New Rocket Based On Taurus II Program

Arianespace selected to launch MEASAT-3b

AMOS-5 Communications Satellite Successfully Launched

Second Arianespace Soyuz rolled out for launch at Spaceport Kourou

Lockheed Martin Delivers GPS 3 Pathfinder Satellite to Denver on Schedule

Galileo in tune as first navigation signal transmitted to Earth

Glonass satnav system targets Latin America and India

Lightweight GPS tags help research track animals of all sizes

Qantas reaches agreement with engineers

Removing sulfur from jet fuel cools climate

Cathay announces economy class upgrade

Airbus eyes Japan's budget carriers

Quantum Computing Has Applications in Magnetic Imaging

Sharpening the lines could lead to even smaller features and faster microchips

Optical Fiber Innovation Could Make Future Optical Computers a 'SNAP'

New method for enhancing thermal conductivity could cool computer chips, lasers and other devices

SMOS detects freezing soil as winter takes grip

NASA Gears Up for Airborne Study of Earth's Radiation Balance

Study Shows More Shrubbery in a Warming World

Astrium awarded Sentinel 5 Precursor contract

Beijing hits 'blue sky' target despite bad air

Mercury releases into the atmosphere from ancient to modern times

Keeping our beaches safe

Christmas shopping hampered as Milan battles smog


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement