Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Copper Shock: An Atomic-scale Stress Test
by Staff Writers
Menlo Park CA (SPX) Oct 25, 2013


These thin samples of copper, iron and titanium were shocked with optical laser pulses and probed with SLAC's X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). (D. Milathianaki, S. Boutet, et al.)

Scientists used the powerful X-ray laser at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to create movies detailing trillionths-of-a-second changes in the arrangement of copper atoms after an extreme shock. Movies like these will help researchers create new kinds of materials and test the strength of existing ones.

This work, published Oct. 11 in Science, pinpointed the precise breaking point when the extreme pressures began to permanently deform the copper structure, or lattice, so it could no longer bounce back to its original shape. Such experiments provide a direct test of complex computer simulations that model the behavior of many millions of atoms within tiny samples of material.

Such simulations are used to design stronger, more durable materials - such as shielding for satellites to withstand high-speed pelting by space debris - but they have been hard to test in the lab because of the tiny samples and short timescales involved.

"The results enable a number of materials experiments that can be compared to simulations at the same scales," said Despina Milathianaki, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) who led the experiment. "This and future experiments, designed to provide a direct comparison with simulations, will help us to accurately predict the strength of materials in extreme conditions."

In this experiment, researchers shocked a layer of copper about 1 thousandth of a millimeter, or 1 micron thick with optical laser pulses, and then probed the copper's lattice with ultrabright X-ray pulses. They compiled the X-ray images into atomic-scale movies that detail how the lattice responded at various times after the shock, including the moment the copper reached its breaking point.

"The demand for research time at LCLS is already at a premium, and these results demonstrate yet another new technique that we believe will open the door to a host of new experiments," said Sebastien Boutet, who leads LCLS's Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Department, where the measurements were performed.

The same research team - composed mostly of SLAC scientists, with collaborators from University of Oxford, Stanford University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - also shocked other metals, including iron and titanium, and is analyzing the data obtained from those samples.

Follow-up research scheduled at LCLS in March seeks to extend the research to additional materials and to enlist other x-ray scattering techniques, which may provide more details about the origins of the damage in the lattice.

.


Related Links
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Crystal mysteries spiral deeper
New York NY (SPX) Oct 25, 2013
New York University chemists have discovered crystal growth complexities, which at first glance appeared to confound 50 years of theory and deepened the mystery of how organic crystals form. But, appearances can be deceiving. Their findings, which appear in the latest edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, have a range of implications - from the production of pharmace ... read more


TECH SPACE
Zoomable Holograms Pave the Way for Versatile, Portable Projectors

Copper Shock: An Atomic-scale Stress Test

Study Finds Natural Compound Can Be Used for 3-D Printing of Medical Implants

NIST measures laser power with portable scale

TECH SPACE
Northrop Grumman Cobham Intercoms Receives First Order For AN VIC-5 Enhanced Vehicular Comms

Raytheon produces new US Army satellite communications terminals ahead of schedule

Lockheed Martin To Continue In Theater Support for Real-Time Surveillance

Lockheed Martin to Deliver Communications and Transmission Services to US Army

TECH SPACE
ILS Proton Launches Sirius FM-6 Satellite

Boeing Finalizes Agreement for Kennedy Space Center Facility

Russia Plans to Spend $22M on Soyuz-2 Launch Pad

Ariane 5 arrives at the Spaceport's Final Assembly Building for payload installation

TECH SPACE
Raytheon demonstrates first Direct Geo-Positioning Metric Sensor

Britain considering car-tracking 'bullet' technology

Orbcomm Launches Solar-Powered Trailer Tracking Solution

Software Uses Cyborg Swarm To Map Unknown Environs

TECH SPACE
Boeing, Lockheed team up for new US Air Force bomber

The Effects of Space Weather on Aviation

Space ballooning: 20-mile-high flights offered for $75K

Boeing Begins Assembling 3rd KC-46A Tanker Aircraft

TECH SPACE
JQI team 'gets the edge' on photon transport in silicon

Atomically Thin Device Promises New Class of Electronics

Tiny Sensors Put the Squeeze on Light

Quantum conductors benefit from growth on smooth foundations

TECH SPACE
Hi-tech aqueduct explorers map Rome's 'final frontier'

NASA satellites help track volcanic ash affecting air travel

New evidence on lightning strikes

How Earth's rotation affects vortices in nature

TECH SPACE
Pollution debated in Canada's oil fields

Mustard gas traces found close to Poland's Baltic Sea coast

Air Pollution Sources And Atmosphere-Warming Particles In South Asia

China to begin inspection plan for air pollution




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement