Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
'Chemical architects' build materials with potential applications in drug delivery and gas storage
by Staff Writers
Pittsburgh PA (SPX) Jun 21, 2013


Nathaniel Rosi.

Home remodelers understand the concept of improving original foundations with more modern elements. Using this same approach-but with chemistry-researchers in the University of Pittsburgh's Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences have designed a family of materials that could make drug delivery, gas storage, and gas transport more efficient and at a lower cost. The findings were reported in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS).

The recent work builds upon Pitt Associate Professor of Chemistry Nathaniel Rosi's earlier research published last year in Nature Communications detailing a new class of metal-organic frameworks-crystalline compounds consisting of metal vertices and organic linkers that form porous structures.

Last year, Rosi and his team created one of the most porous materials known at the time by changing the size of the vertex (the metal cluster) rather than the length of the organic linkers. Now, in JACS, he and his team have extended those linkers, demonstrating a family of materials even more porous-a property necessary for more efficient gas storage.

"We like to think of ourselves as chemical architects," said Rosi, principal investigator of the project.

"Our approach always starts with thinking about structure and, in particular, how we can design and manipulate structure. Here, we demonstrate one of the most porous families of metal-organic frameworks known."

Rosi likens his work to that of a builder remodeling a child's chair. As the child grows taller, the legs of the chair become too short. Because the owner likes the structure and integrity of the chair, the owner decides to lengthen its legs instead of purchasing a new one. This is what Rosi and his team have done with their frameworks: they have used one material as a structural blueprint and replaced another element (the organic linkers) to prepare more porous materials.

In addition to their utility for gas storage, these porous materials could be critical for low-cost industrial separations-when one molecule is separated from another batch of molecules for purification purposes.

The petrochemical industry has numerous high-value (and high-cost) separations used to isolate important chemicals involved with oil refining. Some of these separations could benefit from the use of porous materials as filters, said Rosi. Likewise, he notes that the pore size for his class of materials would be particularly useful for separating nanoparticles. Porosity also can affect the efficiency of pharmaceutical delivery into the human body.

An important metric for evaluating the porosity of a material is its pore volume. In Rosi's demonstration, three of these materials have pore volumes exceeding 4 cubic centimeters per gram (cc/g). For perspective, only one other metal-organic framework has a pore volume above this amount, with most others having volumes below 3 cc/g.

"Pore volume is a measure of how empty or vacant a material is-how much space in the material isn't filled," said Rosi. "When the pore openings are large, and the pore volume is large, it opens up the possibility of using the material as a scaffold to precisely organize and position biomolecules or nanoparticles in space."

Rosi and his team are currently investigating high-porous and low-density materials to be used as scaffolds for organizing large molecules and nanoparticles into functional materials.

Rosi's team members include Tao Li, a Pitt graduate student studying chemistry and the lead researcher on the project, along with Pitt undergraduate chemistry students Mark T. Kozlowski and Evan A. Doud, and Chatham University chemistry undergraduate student Maike N. Blakely. The paper, "Stepwise Ligand Exchange for the Preparation of a Family of Mesoporous MOFs," was first published online May 20 in JACS.

.


Related Links
University of Pittsburgh
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Working backward: Computer-aided design of zeolite templates
Houston TX (SPX) Jun 19, 2013
Taking a page from computer-aided drug designers, Rice University researchers have developed a computational method that chemists can use to tailor the properties of zeolites, one of the world's most-used industrial minerals. The research is available online and will be featured on the cover of the Royal Society of Chemistry's Journal of Materials Chemistry A. The method allows chemists to ... read more


TECH SPACE
Noble gases hitch a ride on hydrous minerals

'Chemical architects' build materials with potential applications in drug delivery and gas storage

Researchers Propose New Method for Achieving Nonlinear Optical Effects

Unexpected behavior of well-known catalysts

TECH SPACE
Northrop Grumman Provides Fuel Quantity Indicator For E-3D AWACS

Canada Makes First Call On AEHF

Mutualink Deploys Full Range of Communications Capabilities

Mutualink Enables New Global Interoperable Communications Network for Large-Scale Multinational Events

TECH SPACE
Four O3b Network birds integrated to Arianespace Soyuz launcher

Arianespace will retain its market leadership by building on the company's flexibility and agility

Plan for modified European rocket gets backing

Peru launches first homemade rocket

TECH SPACE
Raytheon's latest air traffic management systems go into continuous operation

Raytheon's Satellite Air Navigation System marks 10 years of continuous service in the US

Raytheon unveils Excalibur with dual-mode guidance

Northrop Grumman to Offer Improved GPS-Challenged Navigation and Geo-Registration Solution for USAF

TECH SPACE
Airbus shows off new military transport plane

India's Avro replacement fails to lift off

F-35 costs kick up more controversy outside U.S.

US to sell military helicopters to Thailand

TECH SPACE
Making memories: Practical quantum computing moves closer to reality

Samsung unveils hybrid Windows/Android tablet/laptop

Northrop Grumman Develops New Gallium Arsenide E-Band High-Power Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits

New Additive Offers Near-Perfect Results as Nucleating Agent for Organic Semiconductors

TECH SPACE
Vegetation as Seen by Suomi NPP

How did a third radiation belt appear in the Earth's upper atmosphere

Arianespace to launch Gokturk-1 high-resolution observation satellite

Cassini Probe to Take Photo of Earth From Deep Space

TECH SPACE
Indonesia steps up firefighting, Malaysia still in smog

Singapore's economy starts to choke on Indonesia smoke

Shipping firms warn of haze danger in Malacca Strait

Indonesia begins cloud-seeding to fight haze




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement