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TECH SPACE
Asia's iPad imitators hope to bite into Apple's lead

Global downturn a thing of the past for Asia's top IT show
Taipei (AFP) June 6, 2010 - If Asia's largest IT fair, the just-concluded Computex, is anything to go by, the high-tech industry is emerging rapidly from the global crisis: business was brisk during the five-day event in Taipei. The IT extravaganza, which ended Friday, was also energised by the launch of new applications ranging from tablet computers feeding off the iPad mania, to products that measure stress and to Internet technology threatening to make the PC as we know it obsolete. "The global economy is much better than at the same period last year," said Chang Li, deputy secretary-general of the Taipei Computer Association. "That gave the companies more confidence and encouraged them to display their latest product lines at the show." A total of 1,715 exhibitors, including about 1,300 from the tech-savvy island, took part in an event which featured 4,861 booths, a rise of eight percent from 2009, the organisers said.

"The demand was so strong that hundreds of firms had to be shut out of the exhibition venues," Chang said. To a greater extent than in previous years, the organisers also focused on clients from emerging economies such as Russia, India and Turkey, as the global downturn cooled interest somewhat in the old, mature economies of the West. Around 120,000 people visited the fair, including 35,000 international buyers. Roughly 2,000 one-on-one procurement meetings arranged by the organisers during the fair generated on-site business worth 230 million US dollars, according to preliminary data published Saturday. US technology giant Apple was a major presence in the show, and not only for attracting a group of activists protesting outside the venue against work conditions at Chinese factories that produce its iconic iPad and iPhone.

Apple's iPad has triggered unprecedented interest in tablet computers, and Asustek, a leading Taiwanese computer manufacturer, picked the day before the opening of Computex to launch its Eee Tablet and Eee Pad. "I'm afraid we have to give credit to Apple," said Beck Lee, a spokesman for Asustek. "Tablet products are now much more readily accepted by users." Tablet computers, like smartphones which enable users to access the Internet at any time and anywhere, are closely linked to "cloud computing," another major theme of the trade fair. The concept refers to applications or data storage hosted online by technology firms instead of being installed and maintained on users' machines. Microsoft used Computex to announce a Taiwan research centre devoted exclusively to cloud computing.

It was a step that Steven Guggenheimer, a vice president with the US software giant, referred to as a "milestone... in the era of cloud computing". There were other potential milestones. Exhibitors also displayed televisions and PCs broadcasting three-dimensional images at the exhibition venues to meet the interest generated by James Cameron's 3D blockbuster "Avatar." Trade shows like this are about winning hearts and minds -- and spotting the right trend at the right moment. Personal healthcare is one area on which many companies are banking as the next big money earner. The BioDynamic Signature technology, unveiled by Israeli high-tech company IDesia, uses a person's unique heartbeat to tell whether they need to take some time out to relax. But Computex may have shown that, for the IT sector as a whole, the opposite holds true and that the time for relaxing, brought about by the global downturn, is finally over.
by Staff Writers
Hong Kong (AFP) June 6, 2010
When Apple announced the arrival of the iPad, it said it would create and define a brand-new sector in the market for computer devices, somewhere between the smartphone and the notebook laptop.

Two months and over two million iPad sales later a string of Asian manufacturers have shown they agree -- by unveiling their own tablets which they hope will take a bite out of Apple's lead.

Over a dozen new iPad-style gadgets have now entered the fray, and more are sure to follow.

At the Computex computer trade fair in Taipei this week, beautiful models posed with shiny black slabs of clever glass -- most of which looked pretty much the same as Apple's iPad.

First out of the box was the catchily named ASUS Eee Pad 101TC. It's similar in size to the iPad, runs on Windows and will sell for 399 US dollars -- around 100 US dollars less than the US price of a basic iPad.

The MSI WindPad 100, which at 499 US dollars costs the same as the iPad, also runs on Windows and boasts a webcam -- which is conspicuously absent in the first iPad models. LG's new UX10 device also has a webcam.

Many newcomers will also use Adobe's Flash video technology, another perceived flaw in the iPad. Apple refused to allow Flash on its new gadget.

Taiwan-based chipmaker VIA believes the way forward in the tablet market is to go smaller and cheaper.

Its VIA Slate prototype has a seven-inch screen, runs on an old version of Google's Android operating system and will retail for between 100 and 200 US dollars. Several other tablet devices will also run on Android.

Right at the bottom of the market is the iPed -- which seems to be a direct copy of the iPad, even down to the packaging. It is on sale only over the Taiwan Strait in China, selling in a Shenzhen computer mall for 105 dollars.

Nancy Liu of Taiwan's Industrial Technology Research Institute told AFP that companies launching their tablets at Computex wanted to prove "they have the capability to catch the trend set by Apple."

"I don't think the followers are capable of dethroning Apple's leadership at least in the short term," Liu said.

But it's not the gadget, it's what you can do with it that counts. And this is where Apple is also streets ahead of the pack. As Jenny Lai, a Taipei-based technology analyst for brokerage firm CLSA, says: content is king.

"Content remains a critical part of the success story for iPad," she said. "Currently, there are seven major app stores including new entrants Lenovo and Asustek.

"What's more important for Apple and existing vendors is building up a more user-friendly interface and more choices for online-store users."

Apple has more than 100,000 downloadable applications compared to the 500 it offered for the iPhone when it first opened online less than two years ago. Google has more than 30,000 apps available for Android.

Lenovo's application download store for Lephone and other products has around 250 applications. Asustek say it is cooperating with Intel and Microsoft to launch an app store in 2010 on a Windows platform.

And it's not just computer makers watching each other's reaction to this "new" market -- the struggling old school publishing industries are also looking on in hope.

The tablet computer plus its slightly less glamorous cousin, the e-reader, have been hailed as the saviour of the book and newspaper industries.

Sony, which has an e-reader but does not have a tablet computer on the market -- yet -- predicts big changes for the publishing industry on the back of the launch of all these devices.

Steve Haber, president of Sony's digital reading business division, believes the printed book will soon be overtaken by its electronic sister, the same pattern seen with music and photography.

"Within five years there will be more digital content sold than physical content," he told the Daily Telegraph newspaper.

"I have multiple meetings with publishers and tell them paradigm shifts happen. You can say fortunately or unfortunately you haven't had a paradigm shift in, what, hundreds of years.

"We in the consumer electronics area have a paradigm shift every year or two."

earlier related report
Apple's Jobs expected to reveal new iPhone
Washington (AFP) June 5, 2010 - Apple's secrecy about product launches is legendary but when chief executive Steve Jobs takes the stage Monday the world may have already had a glimpse of what is expected to be the next iPhone.

Jobs is to be the keynote speaker at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco, an annual event during which the gadget maker reveals its latest must-have devices.

This year's conference, which has attracted more than 5,000 developers of programs for Macintosh computers, the iPhone, the iPod and the iPad, carries less mystery than years past due to an Apple software engineer's unfortunate evening in a California beer garden a little over two months ago.

The engineer, Robert "Gray" Powell, lost a prototype of the next-generation iPhone while drinking at the Gourmet Haus Staudt near Apple headquarters and it ended up with a 21-year-old man who then sold it to technology blog Gizmodo.

According to Gizmodo, features of the new phone include a front-facing video camera for video conferencing and a better regular camera with a larger lens.

It reportedly has a flat back instead of curved back, is thinner than the previous model, the iPhone 3GS, and has a battery that is 16-percent larger.

Gizmodo, unsurprisingly, will not be in the audience when Jobs makes his keynote address at 10:00 am (1700 GMT). The technology blog said Apple has not responded to its requests to attend the June 7-11 WWDC.

Gartner analyst Van Baker said Gizmodo's revelations about the next iPhone had taken some of the shine off the event.

"I think the biggest challenge Apple's going to face is coming up with enough exciting news to have this truly get the market's attention," Baker said.

The front-facing video camera that will allow iPhone owners to have video chats with Macintosh computers or iPhone to iPhone "will probably be among the biggest news that we see," he said.

"I think there'll be some additional reveals on OS 4.0 (the latest iPhone operating system)," Baker added.

"We might see a new iPod Touch," the Gartner analyst told AFP. "Beyond that, I'm not sure because the iPad's new and the MacBook line -- both the MacBook and the MacBook Pro -- just had a significant refresh.

"So I'm not sure what else to expect from them other than OS4 announcements and a reveal of the new iPhone," he said.

Baker said he did not expect the new iPhone to be "exactly" what Gizmodo displayed but there would probably not be substantive differences.

"I'm sure they had variants of the design floating around and likely made the decision of which ones to manufacture within the last month or so," he said.

Kathryn Huberty of Morgan Stanley said Apple may announce a price cut for the iPhone. A 50-dollar drop in price could result in a 40-percent increase in demand, she estimated.

US wireless carrier AT&T sells the latest iPhone for 199 dollars and a year ago Apple slashed the price for its earliest model to 99 dollars.

Independent technology analyst Carmi Levy said the Gizmodo leak "took some of the surprise out of the event" but called it a "momentary diversion."

In any case, Apple, which has sold more than 50 million iPhones in three years, has taken an approach of "evolution and not revolution" when it comes to the touchscreen smartphone, Levy said.

"When upgrading its iPhone hardware, Apple's goal is never to hit it out of the park," he said. "Rather, the company's intent is to move the bar far enough to maintain its market-dominant position.

"To ensure it has enough new-feature gas in the tank for next year, it never gives customers everything they've asked for in any given year," he said.

"Instead, it includes just enough new features to keep the faithful faithful for another year. It's the ultimate form of controlled marketing, and Apple does it better than virtually any company on the planet."



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TECH SPACE
Murdoch hails Steve Jobs, iPad
New York (AFP) June 2, 2010
Media magnate Rupert Murdoch hailed Apple chief executive Steve Jobs on Wednesday, saying there was "not much doubt" he was the best CEO in America and predicting iPad sales would hit 10 million this year. Apple announced on Monday that it has sold two million of its tablet computers in less than two months, outdoing even the iconic iPhone on its launch. Analysts estimate the California-base ... read more







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