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TECH SPACE
Apple chief makes case against Adobe Flash software

Not enabling flash on the iPhone operating system is a really boring waste of time.

Apple iPhone prototype finder identified
Washington (AFP) April 29, 2010 - A 21-year-old Californian man was identified on Thursday as the person who found and sold an Apple iPhone prototype to the technology blog Gizmodo. Brian Hogan, of Redwood City, California, regrets not doing more to try to return the next-generation iPhone to its owner, an Apple software engineer who left the device behind in a bar, the magazine Wired said on its website. Wired said that Hogan's attorney, Jeffrey Bornstein, had acknowledged in a statement to the technology magazine that Hogan was the finder of the prototype iPhone.

Hogan has been interviewed by law enforcement but has not been charged with a crime, Wired said. According to Hogan's lawyer, he was handed the iPhone by another patron who found it on a bar stool in a Redwood City beer garden. "When no one claimed it, he and his friends left the bar with the device," Wired said. The iPhone had been disguised to resemble the previous model iPhone, the iPhone 3GS. "(Hogan) regrets his mistake in not doing more to return the phone," Wired quoted Bornstein's statement as saying.

"Even though he did obtain some compensation from Gizmodo, Brian thought that it was so that they could review the phone." California police last week raided the home of Jason Chen, the editor for Gizmodo who published details of the iPhone prototype, which the technology blog has said it purchased for 5,000 dollars. Gizmodo has since returned the iPhone prototype to Apple after the notoriously secretive company asked for its return. According to Gizmodo, features of the new phone, expected to be unveiled later this year, include a front-facing video camera for video chat, a flash and an improved regular camera with a larger lens. It also has a flat back instead of curved back, is thinner than the 3GS, is three grams heavier and has a battery that is 16 percent larger.
by Staff Writers
San Francisco (AFP) April 29, 2010
Apple chief executive Steve Jobs took his case against Adobe's Flash software public on Thursday, arguing that the product is a flop on touchscreen gadgets such as the iPhone and iPad.

"Flash was created during the PC (personal computer) era for PCs and mice," Jobs said in an open letter posted at the Cupertino, California-based firm's website.

"But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open Web standards -- all areas where Flash falls short," Jobs said.

Adobe boss Shantanu Narayen fired back calling the criticisms "a smokescreen" in a Wall Street Journal interview live-blogged online.

Apple appears irked about Flash being designed to work across multiple platforms, including those of rivals such as Google with its open-source Android software, according to Narayen.

"We have different views of the world," Narayen said. "Our view of the world is multi-platform."

Jobs complained that relying on Flash would shackle program developers to software designed to work on many platforms instead of crafted to excel on Apple gadgets.

"It is not Adobe's goal to help developers write the best iPhone, iPod and iPad apps," Jobs said.

"It is their goal to help developers write cross platform apps. And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple's platforms."

Narayen countered that Apple's ban of Flash puts developers through the hassle of having to create multiple versions of applications instead of making one program that works on different devices.

Online videos and games are commonly based on Flash, and Apple's refusal to allow Flash on its iPod, iPhone and iPad devices has been a sore point with Adobe.

Lack of Adobe support has also been among top criticisms of Apple gadgets, which have been global hits nonetheless.

Jobs contended that most online video is available in formats other than Flash and therefore "iPhone, iPod, and iPad users aren't missing much video."

He conceded that Apple mobile gadgets don't play Flash-based online games but noted that thousands of games, many of them free, are available at the firm's App Store on the Internet.

"We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now," Jobs said. "We have never seen it."

Apple's decision to bar Flash from its gadgets is technology-based, not a business decision aimed at safeguarding the App Store, as Adobe has insinuated, according to Jobs.

Apple devices instead support video built using HTML5, a fledgling software format created by a group of technology firms including Google and Apple.

Jobs also cited security concerns, saying Flash has a record when it comes to hackers exploiting the software and that Apple deems Flash the prime cause for Macintosh computer crashes.

"We don't want to reduce the reliability and security of our iPhones, iPods and iPads by adding Flash," Jobs said.

Narayen blamed any computer crashing troubles on Apple's operating software and not Adobe programs.

Video done in Flash also devours power, cutting precious battery life in mobile devices, according to Apple. Narayen dismissed the claim as "patently false."

"Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind," Jobs said.

Narayen countered that this is an "incredibly productive time" and that the California company's "innovation is blowing people away."

He expressed confidence that Adobe's multi-platform approach to software wold "eventually prevail" and said he is for "letting customers decide."

The Adobe chief executive also noted that he uses a Nexus One smartphone from Google, not an iPhone.



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TECH SPACE
HP buying Palm for 1.2 billion dollars
New York (AFP) April 28, 2010
US computer giant Hewlett-Packard, in a bid to become a player in the fast-growing smartphone market, said Wednesday it was buying struggling US mobile phone maker Palm for 1.2 billion dollars. HP and Palm said Palm stockholders will receive 5.70 dollars in cash for each share of Palm common stock they hold at the closing of the merger, a premium of 23 percent over Palm's closing price on We ... read more







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