Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Space Industry and Business News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



Aircraft And Automobiles Thrive In Hurricane-Force Winds At Lockheed Martin

The Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT).
by Staff Writers
Marietta GA (SPX) Sep 27, 2007
Lockheed Martin celebrated 40 years of aircraft testing in its Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). On this date in 1967, the first aircraft test, a crew egress trial for the C-5A Galaxy, was conducted. As one of a handful of large subsonic wind tunnels in the country, the Marietta wind tunnel has logged 104,800 hours of testing large scale aircraft models, full-scale automobiles, race cars and structures such as satellite dish antennas and oil derrick models at wind speeds topping the forces of a Category 5 hurricane.

"Before an aircraft ever takes to the sky, we put a model of it in the wind tunnel. Literally since the Wright Brothers, no airplane has taken flight without wind tunnel testing because it is still one of the best ways to learn how an aircraft will perform," said Joe Patrick, manager of Model Operation and Test for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in Marietta . "Wind tunnel testing is also a critical component design of passenger cars, trucks and race cars. In fact, NASCAR regularly sends top-finishing cars here to ensure they meet specifications."

The Marietta wind tunnel is one of only four wind tunnels in the United States that can accommodate large scale aircraft models. Over the past four decades, more than 32 aircraft types have recorded at least 100 test hours, with seven aircraft types recording more than 1,000 test hours. The three F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter variants - conventional takeoff, short takeoff/vertical landing, and Naval aircraft carrier variant - have logged 13,037 hours so far.

This puts Lightning II wind tunnel test hours ahead of the 6,341 for the Marietta-built C-130 Hercules transport and 2,744 for the F-22 Raptor air dominance fighter, which rank second and third on the total test hour list. The LSWT is also one of only two wind tunnels that test both government and commercial vehicles on a regular basis.

The relatively low speeds produced in the LSWT are especially useful for testing aircraft in the approach to landing and post-takeoff flight regimes. High yaw testing and stores separation tests, such as weapons or external fuel tanks released from an aircraft, are other areas where the wind tunnel has proven especially beneficial in aircraft testing.

The first automotive test came on Oct. 11, 1968, when Chrysler brought a Dodge Racing car in for testing. Since then, the LSWT has run more than 58,150 test hours on all types of wheeled vehicles, including passenger cars, stock cars, dragsters, open wheel race cars and trucks. Ford, General Motors, Nissan, Harley-Davidson and NASCAR have all tested vehicles in the Low Speed Wind Tunnel.

The Low Speed Wind Tunnel is a closed loop system, nearly 370 feet long and more than 75 feet wide. The air is moved through the loop by a 39-foot diameter fan powered by a 4,160 volt, 9,000 horsepower motor, which turns the fan at a maximum of 250 revolutions per minute.

Updated continuously over the years, the Low Speed Wind Tunnel now features a digital data acquisition system; large-screen liquid crystal and plasma displays in the control room that allow more data to be displayed as the tests progress; better cooling to maintain a constant temperature and pressure, which allows for more accurate data collection; and an improved data reduction system.

Related Links
Aerospace News at SpaceMart.com



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Cathay Pacific chief hits out at anti-aviation critics
Hong Kong (AFP) Sept 19, 2007
The chief executive of Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific said Wednesday the aviation industry had been unfairly demonised for its role in climate change, and that a more rational debate was required.







  • US cities' Wi-Fi dreams fading fast
  • Digital Dandelions: The Flowering Of Network Research
  • Researchers Aim To Make Internet Bandwidth A Global Currency
  • Controlling Bandwidth In The Clouds

  • Pratt And Whitney Rocketdyne's RS-27A Powers New-Gen Imaging Satellite To Orbit
  • United Launch Alliance Launches 75th Consecutive Delta II On USAF 60th Anniversary
  • Russian Space Launch Vehicle Firing Tests Set For 2008
  • Arianespace To Launch Japanese Satellite JCSAT-12

  • Aircraft And Automobiles Thrive In Hurricane-Force Winds At Lockheed Martin
  • New Delft Material Concept For Aircraft Wings Could Save Billions
  • Cathay Pacific chief hits out at anti-aviation critics
  • Squabble over airline carbon emissions takes flight

  • China's military tests sophisticated real-time data system
  • ThalesRaytheonSystems To Provide Upgrade For Battle Control System
  • Northrop Grumman Receives Major Contract For Guardrail Modernization
  • Boeing Demonstrates FAB-T Interoperability With Milstar Satellite

  • Foton-M3 Experiments Return To Earth
  • Radio Wave Cooling Offers New Twist On Laser Cooling
  • SSC Communication System Flys On Russian Capsule Foton
  • Engineers Rescue Aging Satellites And Save Millions

  • Analysis: Sulick new head spy for CIA
  • Raytheon Names Dr. Thomas Kennedy VP Tactical Airborne Systems
  • Northrop Grumman Appoints James Myers VP And GM Of Navigation Systems Division
  • Senior Official Of Energia Space Appointed President

  • Boeing Launches WorldView-1 Earth-Imaging Satellite
  • New Faraway Sensors Warn Of Emerging Hurricane's Strength
  • Key Sensor For Northrop Grumman NPOESS Program Passes Critical Structural Test
  • Air France And ESA Join To Offer Passengers Unique View Of Voyage

  • EU plans for funding Galileo satnav system already hitting snags
  • Galileo GPS Network Hit By More Delays
  • Brussels to present finance plans to save Galileo satnav project
  • DoD Permanently Discontinues Procurement Of Global Positioning System Selective Availability

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright Space.TV Corporation. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space.TV Corp on any Web page published or hosted by Space.TV Corp. Privacy Statement