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3-D TV a rage at Consumer Electronics Show

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Samsung teams up with DreamWorks, Technicolor for 3-D
Las Vegas, Nevada (AFP) Jan 6, 2010 - South Korea's Samsung teamed up with DreamWorks Animation, maker of "Shrek," "Kung Fu Panda" and other hit movies, and Technicolor on Wednesday in a push to bring more 3-D entertainment into the home. Samsung, DreamWorks and Technicolor announced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) here that they have formed a "global strategic alliance for the delivery of a complete 3-D home entertainment solution in 2010." They said they were joining forces to "accelerate the worldwide deployment of in-home 3-D to mainstream consumers." Samsung is one of a number of major electronics manufacturers displaying 3-D high-definition television sets at CES this year as the industry seeks to expand 3-D viewing beyond the movie screen and into the living room. Growth of 3-D has been slow because of a lack of programming, the need to wear special glasses and the higher prices of 3-D sets, but last month's release of science fiction blockbuster "Avatar," a 3-D film by "Titanic" director James Cameron, has renewed interest in the medium.

US sports broadcaster ESPN announced on Tuesday that it will show some World Cup soccer matches live from South Africa in 3-D and Japan's Sony is partnering with Discovery and IMAX to launch a 3-D TV network in the United States. "We're forging the future of entertainment in what we like to call a new dimension," Tim Baxter, president of the consumer electronics division at Samsung Electronics America, said at a Samsung press conference. He said Samsung, which came out with its first 3-D HDTV in 2007, would be marketing a "complete 3-D entertainment offering for the home" featuring a 3-D television set, 3-D Blu-Ray player and "stylish active shutter 3-D glasses." "3-D has had a bumpy ride since the first 3-D film back in 1922," Baxter said. "Today though technology has improved dramatically and it's clear people love watching 3-D in theaters. "Consumers are now expecting the same 3-D experience that they are getting in the theater in their home," Baxter said, adding that the new Samsung products deliver "a complete cinema quality 3-D movie experience at home." DreamWorks Animation chief executive Jeffrey Katzenberg, in an appearance at the Samsung event at CES, said 3-D was no longer a "novelty" but a "fantastic creative and business opportunity." "Today because of 3-D we stand at a watershed moment for the entire movie industry," Katzenberg said. "It's an incredible artistic tool for filmmakers and it has proven to be very big business."
by Staff Writers
Las Vegas, Nevada (AFP) Jan 7, 2010
A breathtaking wave of 3-D televisions has hit the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), where the technology is being touted as the next big thing in home theater.

"When it comes to home entertainment, there really is no experience like 3-D," Sony chief executive Howard Stringer said while unveiling the innovations Wednesday on the eve of the official start of CES in Las Vegas.

"We intend to take the lead in 3-D. We want to provide the most compelling 3-D content possible."

The Japanese electronics giant's plans range from being part of a 3-D television network in the United States to streaming live performances in the format.

Country music star Taylor Swift performed during the press conference in a Sony demonstration of live 3-D broadcasting and said she will document her coming Asia tour in the format.

Sony has teamed with Discovery and IMAX in a 3-D TV network and with ESPN to broadcast soccer matches and golf in 3-D.

While the depth-perception technology has been around for years, it is finally "ready for prime time" as proven by box office successes of recent films "Avatar" and "Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs," according to IMAX.

Sony will release a line of 3-D-ready televisions this year capable of synching with sensing units and "active shutter glasses," worn by viewers to create the illusion of a three-dimensional image.

On the CES show floor, massive TV screens linked to wireless versions of the glasses for a 3-D effect were displayed by South Korea's LG Electronics.

"3-D is going to be the next big buzz," LG's Randy Overton told AFP. "Everyone is going to want it. Then, the gaming systems will jump on."

Forrester Research analyst James McQuivey said that while 3-D offerings are visually stunning, it is unlikely consumers will rush to buy the premium-priced television sets.

Many consumers upgraded to high-definition sets in the past three years, and an infrastructure to deliver 3-D content to homes isn't in place, according to McQuivey.

"I know we are all excited about how well 'Avatar' did, but it is very hard to jump on this bandwagon when you don't see a path for bringing it into anyone's home," McQuivey told AFP.

Growth of 3-D has been slow because of a lack of programming, the need for the special glasses and the higher prices of 3-D sets, but last month's release of science fiction blockbuster "Avatar," a 3-D film by "Titanic" director James Cameron, has renewed interest in the medium.

The likelihood that adoption of 3-D TV may take years, as did the Blu-ray DVD format, has not deterred manufacturers.

Toshiba unveiled a flat-panel Cell TV that converts digital video into 3-D.

Panasonic went 3-D with a "Live In It" campaign for its electronics.

"3-D is not about guys jumping off the screen, but really a more immersive and a more engaging experience for the consumer," said "Avatar" producer Jon Landau at a Panasonic event here.

"It heightens the senses. I think you'll see 3-D become ubiquitous."

South Korea's Samsung teamed up Wednesday with DreamWorks Animation, maker of "Shrek" and other hit movies, and Technicolor in a push to bring more 3-D entertainment into the home.

The three firms announced they have formed an alliance to "accelerate the worldwide deployment of in-home 3-D to mainstream consumers."

Samsung will be marketing a "complete 3-D entertainment offering for the home" featuring a 3-D television set, 3-D Blu-Ray player and "stylish active shutter 3-D glasses."

Technicolor chief executive Frederic Rose, hopes to capitalize on the current excitement over the format, saying 3-D in theaters is "a gateway into the home."



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Blockbuster 'Avatar' to accelerate 3D revolution
Los Angeles (AFP) Jan 5, 2010
The runaway success of science fiction blockbuster "Avatar" will accelerate the 3D movie revolution, which has already powered Hollywood to a record year at the box office, analysts say. James Cameron's futuristic fantasy is on course to become the highest-grossing movie of all time after smashing the one-billion-dollar barrier in only three weeks over the weekend. The film, which has a ... read more







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