Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Space Industry and Business News .




AEROSPACE
The humble 'virtual chimney' fences that could reduce the impact of airport pollution
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Feb 04, 2013


Testing the baffles at Cranfield airport.

Simple 'blast' fences called baffles could deliver improvements in air quality for people living near airports, new research has found.

Placed behind a runway, the baffles could serve as a 'virtual chimney', funnelling emissions from aircraft engines upwards where they can disperse more effectively, thereby reducing the environmental impact on people living nearby.

Prototype baffles have been tested by a team of researchers from Manchester Metropolitan University, Cranfield University, Southampton University and the University of Cambridge, with funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

After preliminary wind tunnel testing of various baffle shapes carried out by Cranfield University, an array of three rows of baffles was tested using laser scanning (Lidar, which is the optical equivalent of Radar) and chemical sensor techniques at Cranfield Airport in Bedfordshire.

This demonstrated that the aircraft exhaust plume could be made to leave the ground within the airport's boundary fence, using prototype baffles of less than a man's height and constructed out of low-cost agricultural windbreak netting on lightweight frames.

Dr Mike Bennett, who led the project, says: "Airfield surfaces are typically covered with grass, over which the wind can blow freely. An array of baffles makes the surface rough in an aerodynamic sense. This sucks the momentum out of the exhaust jet, allowing its natural buoyancy to come into play. By suitably angling the baffles, we can also give the exhaust an upwards push, encouraging it to rise away from the ground.

"The baffles we tested were tilted at angles between 40 and 60 in order to optimise this vertical flow - and to ensure the baffles didn't blow over! Although the exhaust will still disperse to the ground eventually, it will do so at a lower concentration. We might hope to see a reduction in surface concentrations of around 50 per cent at the perimeter fence behind the place where aircraft are taking off."

Long-term ground-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations around many major airports in Europe already exceed the legal limit enforced by the EU.

The aim of the trial was essentially to test the baffles' aerodynamics. As the prototype installation was temporary, it was constructed very differently from how a permanent installation might be made. Each baffle must be sufficiently robust to withstand the 80-90 knot blast from a jet engine, but flimsy enough to collapse harmlessly if an aircraft were to hit it.

In the trial, this was achieved by restricting the prototype baffle widths to about two metres but it would be feasible to make them much narrower in a permanent installation. For full-scale use an area of baffles in the order of a thousand square metres would need to be erected behind a runway.

The tests also showed that the baffles dampened engine noise downstream by a modest amount and were helpful in reducing jet blast on the airport perimeter.

"There's no reason why baffles couldn't start to be installed at airports within two or three years," Dr Bennett says. "From the point of view of local air quality, they represent a quick, cheap supplement to developing low-NOx jet engines."

The project was carried out under the auspices of the EPSRC-funded Airport Energy Technologies Network (AETN), which was established in 2008 to undertake cutting-edge research in the field of aviation.

The development of the baffles has taken place as part of the three year project, under the Research Councils UK (RCUK) Energy Programme, 'A Study of Practical Abatement Techniques for Exhaust Jets from Commercial Aircraft', which concluded in the autumn of 2012 and received total EPSRC funding of Pounds 413,000. The University of Cambridge provided air quality monitoring expertise for the field tests. The Institute of Sound and Vibration Research in the University of Southampton carried out the acoustic studies.

.


Related Links
Research Councils UK (RCUK) Energy Program
Aerospace News at SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





AEROSPACE
Iran unveils futuristic-looking warplane
Tehran (AFP) Feb 2, 2013
Iran on Saturday unveiled a fighter jet it said was designed and built domestically, with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad touting it as "one of the most advanced" aircraft in the world. State television footage showed the grey, futuristic-looking aircraft, code-named Qaher (Conqueror) F-313, displayed in a hangar. The warplane "is among the most advanced fighter jets in the world," Ahmadin ... read more


AEROSPACE
Novel materials shake ship scum

Penn Research Shows Mechanism Behind Wear at the Atomic Scale

NTU research embraces laser and sparks cool affair

Bioinspired fibers change color when stretched

AEROSPACE
TACLANE-1G Encryptor Certified by NSA

Boeing Completes FAB-T Software Qualification Testing For AEHF and Milstar Birds

Smartphone to hold integrated warrior gear

Raytheon offers Global Aircrew Strategic Network Terminal Soultion

AEROSPACE
Zenit Engine Worked Normally

NASA Launches Rocket from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia

Intelsat 27 Launch Unsuccessful

Floating platform unharmed after Zenit launch failure

AEROSPACE
Fleet Managers Able to Track Drivers' Hours with Vehicle Tracking Systems

Galileo's search and rescue system passes first space test

AFRL Selects Surrey Satellite US to Evaluate Small Satellite Approach to GPS

Lockheed Martin Awarded Contract to Sustain Ground Station for Global Positioning System

AEROSPACE
The humble 'virtual chimney' fences that could reduce the impact of airport pollution

JAL says nine-month net profit slips, ups year forecast

India gives Seychelles Dornier aircraft

100th F-35 On Lockheed Martin's Production Line

AEROSPACE
Rutgers Physics Professors Find New Order in Quantum Electronic Material

3D microchip created

A new material for environmentally friendlier electronics

Novel materials: smart and magnetic

AEROSPACE
Google Maps makes Grand Canyon virtual trek

Remote Sensing Solution Takes Wing Aboard Ultralight Aircraft

New tools enable high-res observations from anywhere with internet access

Internet age navigation drives economies: studies

AEROSPACE
China's thick smog arrives in Japan

Hospital visits rise during Beijing's choking smog

Beijing issues warnings as smog continues

Beijing issues warnings as smog continues




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement