Space Industry and Business News  





. Smart Fabric Biosensors Will Monitor Respiration Rate And Body Temperature In Real Time

The success of the research is promising for patients whose vital signs must be continuously monitored. Varadan said the sensors and wireless networks can fit on garments such as undershirts. With this technology, the smart fabric can monitor vital signs and collect and send data to an information hub in real time.
by Staff Writers
Fayetteville AR (SPX) Jul 19, 2007
Working with an organic semiconductor, electrical-engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas have fabricated and tested two similar but slightly different biosensors that can measure important physiological signs. Integrated into "smart" fabrics - garments with wireless technology - the sensors will be able to monitor a patient's respiration rate and body temperature in real time and thus provide point-of-care diagnostics to health-care professionals and greater freedom for patients.

"We're trying to move diagnostic testing out of the laboratory and directly to the patient," said Taeksoo Ji, assistant professor of electrical engineering. "Although there has been some success at this effort over the past decade, traditional materials are not suitable for manufacturing low-cost, large-area sensor devices. The advantages of organic semiconductors will allow manufacturers to produce devices that are light, flexible and easily integrated into biomedical applications such as smart vests and fabrics."

The researchers - Ji and Soyoun Jung, a graduate student in electrical engineering, under the direction of Vijay Varadan, Distinguished Professor of electrical engineering - worked with pentacene, a hydrocarbon molecule, and carbon nanotubes to develop the two types of sensors - a temperature sensor and a strain sensor. The addition of carbon nanotubes with pentacene increases sensor sensitivity. As an organic semiconductor, pentacene is efficient and easy to control. Both sensors were fabricated directly on flexible polymeric substrates.

The strain sensor, which would monitor respiration rate, consisted of a Wheatstone bridge, an instrument that measures unknown electrical resistance, and a thin pentacene film that acted as a sensing layer. The system would work when a physiological strain, such as breathing, creates a mechanical deformation of the sensor, which then affects the electrical current's resistance. The researchers found that the smaller the sensor, the more sensitive it was to current variations.

For the temperature sensor, the researchers used what is known as a thin-film transistor, which is a special kind of transistor that deposits thin film semiconductors on substrates. The thin-film transistor helped the researchers observe electrical current in linear response to temperature change. Most importantly, in low voltage areas, the current displayed the highest sensitivity to temperature changes.

The success of the research is promising for patients whose vital signs must be continuously monitored. Varadan said the sensors and wireless networks can fit on garments such as undershirts. With this technology, the smart fabric can monitor vital signs and collect and send data to an information hub in real time. The information can provide immediate detection of physiological abnormalities, which will allow physicians to begin treatment or prevent illness before problems reach an acute stage.

The research was done in the Organic Electronics and Devices Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering's Center for Nano-, Bio-, and Info-Technology Sensors and Systems. Varadan is director of the center.

Varadan holds the College of Engineering's Twenty-First Century Endowed Chair in Nano- and Bio-Technologies and Medicine and the college's Chair in Microelectronics and High Density Electronics. In addition to his position director of the above center, he directs the university's High Density Electronics Center. Varadan is also a professor of neurosurgery in the College of Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Related Links
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Space Technology News - Applications and Research




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
DuPont And NASA To Develop Kevlar Reinforced Insulation For Next Gen Space Vehicles
Wilmington DE (SPX) Jul 13, 2007
DuPont has announced that it has signed a Space Act Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to jointly develop urethane foam insulation reinforced with DuPont Kevlar fiber for use in a variety of future spacecraft, including the new launch vehicle being designed to replace the space shuttle.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Vizada Launches SkyFile Access For Better Mobile Satellite Data Transfer
  • Bringing Mobile Cellular Phones To The Skyways
  • Rockwell Collins And ARINC Sign Agreement For Broadband Offering
  • Academic Group Releases Plan To Share Power Over Internet Root Zone Keys

  • Spaceway 3 Is Delivered To The Spaceport For Its Mid-August Ariane 5 Launch
  • Russian Space Firm Signs 14 Deals For Commercial Rocket Launches
  • Sea Launch To Resume Zenit Launches In October
  • Russia Proton-M Booster Puts US Satellite Into Orbit

  • Goodrich Contributes Technology For Environmentally-Friendly Engine Research Program
  • Sukhoi Super Jet: The Great White Hope Of The Russian Aircraft Industry
  • Sarkozy, Merkel To Tackle Airbus Problems
  • Boeing Awarded Two Billion Dollar A-10 Wing Contract

  • A-10s Get Digital Makeover
  • TSAT Team Demonstrates Technology Maturity Of Laser Communications Subsystem
  • Boeing Showcases Operational TSAT System During Critical Review
  • Lockheed Martin Shifts Into Production Phase Of Navy Narrowband Tactical Satellite

  • Nature's Secrets Yield New Adhesive Material
  • Smart Fabric Biosensors Will Monitor Respiration Rate And Body Temperature In Real Time
  • BAE Systems To Produce Field Programmable Gate Array For Space Use
  • Researchers Develop Tool For Clearer Ultrasound Images

  • NASA Administrator Names Ryschkewitsch As New Chief Engineer
  • Hall Appoints Feeney To Top GOP Position On Space And Aeronautics Subcommittee
  • Dodgen Joins Northrop Grumman As Vice President Of Strategy For Missile Systems Business
  • Townsend To Lead Ball Aerospace Exploration Systems In Huntsville

  • NASA Awards Contract For Land-Imaging Instrument
  • GOP House Science Committee To Evaluate NASA Earth Science Budget
  • Subcommittee Continues Look At Status of NASA Earth Science Programs
  • QuikSCAT Marks Eight Years On-Orbit Watching Planet Earth

  • Helicopter Flight Trials For EGNOS
  • Boeing To Submit Proposal For Global Positioning System 3
  • Pseudo-Satellites Allow Accurate Navigation In Helsinki Harbour
  • Cooperation Agreement For Satellite Navigation In Africa

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright Space.TV Corporation. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space.TV Corp on any Web page published or hosted by Space.TV Corp. Privacy Statement