Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




INTERNET SPACE
Next-gen e-readers: Improved 'peacock' technology could lock in color for high-res displays
by Staff Writers
Ann Arbor MI (SPX) Feb 12, 2013


File image.

Iridescence, or sheen that shifts color depending on your viewing angle, is pretty in peacock feathers. But it's been a nuisance for engineers trying to mimic the birds' unique color mechanism to make high-resolution, reflective, color display screens.

Now, researchers at the University of Michigan have found a way to lock in so-called structural color, which is made with texture rather than chemicals. A paper on the work is published online in the current edition of the Nature journal Scientific Reports.

In a peacock's mother-of-pearl tail, precisely arranged hairline grooves reflect light of certain wavelengths. That's why the resulting colors appear different depending on the movement of the animal or the observer. Imitating this system-minus the rainbow effect-has been a leading approach to developing next-generation reflective displays.

The new U-M research could lead to advanced color e-books and electronic paper, as well as other color reflective screens that don't need their own light to be readable. Reflective displays consume much less power than their backlit cousins in laptops, tablet computers, smartphones and TVs. The technology could also enable leaps in data storage and cryptography. Documents could be marked invisibly to prevent counterfeiting.

Led by Jay Guo, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, the researchers harnessed the ability of light to funnel into nanoscale metallic grooves and get trapped inside. With this approach, they found the reflected hues stay true regardless of the viewer's angle.

"That's the magic part of the work," Guo said. "Light is funneled into the nanocavity, whose width is much, much smaller than the wavelength of the light. And that's how we can achieve color with resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Also counterintuitive is that longer wavelength light gets trapped in narrower grooves."

The diffraction limit was long thought to be the smallest point you could focus a beam of light to. Others have broken the limit as well, but the U-M team did so with a simpler technique that also produces stable and relatively easy-to-make color, Guo said.

"Each individual groove-much smaller than the light wavelength-is sufficient to do this function. In a sense, only the green light can fit into the nanogroove of a certain size," Guo said.

The U-M team determined what size slit would catch what color light. Within the framework of the print industry standard cyan, magenta and yellow color model, the team found that at groove depths of 170 nanometers and spacing of 180 nanometers, a slit 40 nanometers wide can trap red light and reflect a cyan color.

A slit 60 nanometers wide can trap green and make magenta. And one 90 nanometers wide traps blue and produces yellow. The visible spectrum spans from about 400 nanometers for violet to 700 nanometers for red.

"With this reflective color, you could view the display in sunlight. It's very similar to color print," Guo said.

To make color on white paper, (which is also a reflective surface), printers arrange pixels of cyan, magenta and yellow in such a way that they appear to our eyes as the colors of the spectrum. A display that utilized Guo's approach would work in a similar way.

To demonstrate their device, the researchers etched nanoscale grooves in a plate of glass with the technique commonly used to make integrated circuits, or computer chips. Then they coated the grooved glass plate with a thin layer of silver.

When light-which is a combination of electric and magnetic field components-hits the grooved surface, its electric component creates what's called a polarization charge at the metal slit surface, boosting the local electric field near the slit. That electric field pulls a particular wavelength of light in.

Right now, the new device can make static pictures, and the researchers hope to develop a moving picture version in the near future.

The research is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation. The paper is titled "Angle-Insensitive Structural Colours based on Metallic Nanocavities and Coloured Pixels beyond the Diffraction Limit."

Abstract

.


Related Links
University of Michigan
Satellite-based Internet technologies






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





INTERNET SPACE
New modeling approach transforms imaging technologies
West Lafayette IN (SPX) Feb 12, 2013
Researchers are improving the performance of technologies ranging from medical CT scanners to digital cameras using a system of models to extract specific information from huge collections of data and then reconstructing images like a jigsaw puzzle. The new approach is called model-based iterative reconstruction, or MBIR. "It's more-or-less how humans solve problems by trial and erro ... read more


INTERNET SPACE
3D Printing on the Micrometer Scale

Nextdoor renovates before taking on the world

High-energy X-rays shine light on mystery of Picasso's paints

Satellite undergoes extreme testing

INTERNET SPACE
XTAR To Expand Beyond NATO As African And Asian Hot Spots Flare

How the DoD Can More Efficiently Acquire Satellite Systems and Capacity

TACLANE-1G Encryptor Certified by NSA

Boeing Completes FAB-T Software Qualification Testing For AEHF and Milstar Birds

INTERNET SPACE
Ariane 5 delivers record payload off back-to-back launches this week

Eutelsat and Arianespace sign new multi-year multiple launch services agreement

Ariane 5 Arrives At Kourou For 4th Automated Transfer Vehicle Mission

Rocketdyne Powers Atlas 5 Upper Stage, Placing New Landsat In Orbit

INTERNET SPACE
System improves GPS in city locations

Boeing to modernize U.S. Air Force GPS net

Smart satnav drives around the blue highway blues

Lockheed Martin Completes Major GPS III Flight Software Milestone

INTERNET SPACE
Boeing and Elbit Systems to Collaborate on Aircraft Defense Solutions

F-35A Completes 3-Year Clean Wing Flutter Testing Program

E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Approved For Full-Rate Production

Major fighter jet deal, trade dominate Hollande's India trip

INTERNET SPACE
European Investments in Advanced Computing Systems Deliver Results

A review of the rapidly evolving field of topological insulator hybrid structures

Biological circuits with memory created

Rutgers Physics Professors Find New Order in Quantum Electronic Material

INTERNET SPACE
US launches Earth observation satellite

NightPod Images Bring Earth to Light From Space Station

Landsat Data Continuity Mission Awaits Liftoff

Ball Supplies Advanced Imaging Instrument For Landsat 8

INTERNET SPACE
Philippine development sparks 'sunset' protest

Waste Dump at the End of the World

Japan proposes pollution meeting with China

China jails pollution protesters: state mediaw




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement