. Space Industry and Business News .

Lockheed Martin Space Fence Radar Prototype Tracking Orbiting Objects
by Staff Writers
Moorestown NJ (SPX) Mar 14, 2012

today, with hundreds of thousands of objects orbiting the earth, space debris and risk of potential collisions now threaten national space assets providing critical services, including the Global Positioning System, banking and telecommunications.

A prototype of a new radar system developed by a Lockheed Martin-led team is now tracking orbiting space objects, bringing the U.S. Air Force's Space Fence program one step closer to revolutionizing our nation's space situational awareness.

Utilizing powerful, new ground-based radars, Space Fence will enhance the way the U.S. detects, tracks, measures and catalogs orbiting objects and space debris with improved accuracy, better timeliness and increased surveillance coverage. Lockheed Martin's prototype radar recently met a key contract requirement during a series of demonstration events by proving it could detect these resident space objects, as they are referred to by the Air Force.

On February 29, the Air Force granted its final approval of Lockheed Martin's preliminary design for the system.

"The successful detection and tracking of resident space objects are important steps in demonstrating technology maturity, cost certainty and low program risk," said Steve Bruce, vice president of the Space Fence program at Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems and Sensors business. "Our final system design incorporates a scalable, solid-state S-band radar, with a higher wavelength frequency capable of detecting much smaller objects than the Air Force's current system."

Space Fence will enable the decommissioning of the aging U.S.-based Air Force Space Surveillance System (AFSSS), originally installed in 1961. With more than 60 nations operating in space today, the final frontier is much more complex than when the AFSSS first started tracking a few hundred orbiting objects.

today, with hundreds of thousands of objects orbiting the earth, space debris and risk of potential collisions now threaten national space assets providing critical services, including the Global Positioning System, banking and telecommunications.

Bruce added, "Space Fence will detect, track and catalog over 200,000 orbiting objects and help transform space situational awareness from being reactive to predictive. The Air Force will have more time to anticipate events potentially impacting space assets and missions. Our net-centric design approach allows Space Fence to be easily integrated into the broader U.S. Space Surveillance Network of sensors already operated by the Air Force."

Lockheed Martin's Space Fence prototype was developed under an 18-month, $107 million contract awarded by the Air Force in January 2011. The Air Force has said it plans to award a Space Fence production contract later in 2012. The first of several Space Fence sites is expected to reach initial operational capability in 2017.

With more than 400 operational S-band arrays deployed worldwide, Lockheed Martin is a leader in S-band radar development, production, operation and sustainment. The Lockheed Martin-led team - which includes General Dynamics, AMEC and AT and T - has decades of collective experience in space-related programs, including sensors, mission processing, cataloging, orbital mechanics, net-centric communications and facilities.

Related Links
Space Fence at Lockheed Martin
Space Technology News - Applications and Research

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

NASA exploring ways to clean up space debris
Tampa FL (IANS) Mar 13, 2012
Faced with increasing threats of space debris, the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is actively exploring ways to clean up the outer space. Donald Kessler, an astrophysicist at NASA's Environmental Effects Office, said the space industry has been slowly developing ideas for over 30 years on how to proceed to clean up space junk, but none has ever been fully tested. ... read more

AU Optronics guilty in display screen price-fixing case

China prepares rare earths defense

Lockheed Martin Space Fence Radar Prototype Tracking Orbiting Objects

Lost smartphones mined by finders: Symantec

TacSat-4 Enables Polar Region SatCom Experiment

'See Me' satellites may help ground forces

Boeing and Artel to Provide Commercial Satellite Services to US Government

Raytheon And DARPA to Help Friendly Forces Communicate While Conducting Electronic Warfare

Europe's Arianespace inks new deals at US conference

ILS Announces A New Contract For The ILS Proton Launch Of The Mexsat-1 Satellite

Launch Madness at Wallops in March - "Five in Five"

Engineers Tuck NuSTAR in its Nose Cone

Iris: watch how satcoms help pilots

Smartphones can help track diseases

Court ruling forces FBI to deactivate GPS to track suspects

Galileo to spearhead extension of worldwide search and rescue service

Hydrogen-powered plane completes taxi test

Airbus fears China blocking more A330 sales: source

Chinese diplomat sees airlines turning to Boeing over EU tax

EADS says EU carbon tax blocking Airbus orders from China

Biodegradable Transistors - Made from Us

Resetting the future of MRAM

Weak growth seen in PC shipments this year: Gartner

UBC researcher invents "lab on a chip" device to study malaria

Multi-Agency Satellite Begins Climate and Weather Studies

TerraSAR-X brings lively winter view into focus

SOA gains control of China's oceanic surveying satellite

NASA Researchers on the Snow Patrol

Manganese concentrations higher in residential neighborhoods than industrial sites, varies by region

EC: Poland veto won't stop 'road map'

Gorbachev calls for global court for environmental crimes

BP oil spill hurt marshes, but recovery possible

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement