Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Space Industry and Business News .




TECH SPACE
Materials and electronics that dissolve when triggered
by Staff Writers
Ames, IA (SPX) Apr 07, 2014


Iowa State's Reza Montazami examines a degradable antenna capable of data transmission. Image courtesy Bob Elbert.

A medical device, once its job is done, could harmlessly melt away inside a person's body. Or, a military device could collect and send its data and then dissolve away, leaving no trace of an intelligence mission. Or, an environmental sensor could collect climate information, then wash away in the rain.

It's a new way of looking at electronics: "You don't expect your cell phone to dissolve someday, right?" said Reza Montazami, an Iowa State University assistant professor of mechanical engineering. "The resistors, capacitors and electronics, you don't expect everything to dissolve in such a manner that there's no trace of it."

But Montazami thinks it can happen and is developing the necessary materials.

He calls the technology "transient materials" or "transient electronics." The materials are special polymers designed to quickly and completely melt away when a trigger is activated. It's a fairly new field of study and Montazami says he's making progress.

The research team he's leading, for example, is developing degradable polymer composite materials that are suitable platforms for electronic components. The team has also built and tested a degradable antenna capable of data transmission.

The team presented some of its research results at the recent meeting of the American Chemical Society in Dallas.

And, a paper describing some of the team's work, "Study of Physically Transient Insulating Materials as a Potential Platform for Transient Electronics and Bioelectronics," has just been published online by the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

The paper focuses on the precise control of the degradation rate of polymer composite materials developed for transient electronics.

Montazami is the lead senior author of the paper. Iowa State co-authors are Nastaran Hashemi, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering; Handan Acar and Simge Cinar, postdoctoral research associates in mechanical engineering; and Mahendra Thunga, a postdoctoral research associate in materials science and engineering and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory. Michael Kessler, formerly of Iowa State and now professor and director of Washington State University's School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering in Pullman, is also a co-author.

The research has been supported by Montazami's startup funds from Iowa State. He's pursuing grants to support additional projects.

"Investigation of electronic devices based on transient materials (transient electronics) is a new and rarely addressed technology with paramount potentials in both medical and military applications," the researchers wrote in the paper.

To demonstrate that potential, Montazami played a video showing a blue light-emitting diode mounted on a clear polymer composite base with the electrical leads embedded inside. Add a drop of water and the base and wiring begin to melt away. Before long the light goes out and a second drop of water degrades what little is left.

The researchers have developed and tested transient resistors and capacitors. They're working on transient LED and transistor technology, said Montazami, who started the research as a way to connect his background in solid-state physics and materials science with applied work in mechanical engineering.

As the technology develops, Montazami sees more and more potential for the commercial application of transient materials.

Just think, he said, if you lose your credit card, you could send out a signal that causes the card to self-destruct. Or, sensors programmed to degrade over certain times and temperatures could be stored with food. When the sensors degrade and stop sending a signal, that food is no longer fresh. Or, when soldiers are wounded, their electronic devices could be remotely triggered to melt away, securing sensitive military information.

.


Related Links
Mechanical Engineering at Iowa State University
Space Technology News - Applications and Research






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





TECH SPACE
Chile quake pushes copper price to three-week high
London (AFP) April 02, 2014
The vast earthquake in Chile sent copper prices jumping to a three-week peak on Wednesday, as traders worried about possible supply problems in the top global producer. At 1230 GMT, copper rallied to $6,734 per tonne, striking the highest point since March 10. "Copper has hit a three-week high as an enormous earthquake off the coast of Chile as sparked fears of a tsunami," said IG analys ... read more


TECH SPACE
Chile quake pushes copper price to three-week high

Space Observation Optics Cover from IR to X-ray Wavelengths

Intel bets big on cloud, with stake in Cloudera

Happily surprised? Sadly angry? Computer tags emotions

TECH SPACE
Testing Begins on Third AEHF Satellite

Mutualink Obtains Key NATO Certification

NGG Starts Integration Of High-Speed Downlink Antennas EHF Comms Payload

Catching signals from a speeding satellite

TECH SPACE
Soyuz ready for Sentinel-1A satellite launch

Boeing wins contract to design DARPA Airborne Satellite Launch

Arianespace's seventh Soyuz mission from French Guiana is readied for liftoff next week

NASA Seeks Suborbital Flight Proposals

TECH SPACE
FAA Approves DeLorme Communicator For Service In Alaska

LockMart Taps General Dynamics For Network Element On GPS 3 Birds

First GLONASS satellite in 2014 put in orbit

Astro Aerospace Delivers Antennas For Next-Gen GPS III Satellites 3 through 6

TECH SPACE
Australia probes 'encouraging' signals in MH370 hunt

Philippines signs military aircraft contracts for $528mn

Swiss-Swedish fighter deal could triple in cost: opponents

U.S. Marine KC-130Js getting Rolls-Royce service for engines

TECH SPACE
Chipmaker Marvell told to pay $1.5 bn in patent case

Computing with Slime

Arotech Corporation acquires UEC Electronics

Researchers announce first phononic crystal that can be altered in real time

TECH SPACE
Euroconsult Releases Study On EO Data Distribution Trends

Satellite Movie Shows US East Coast Snowy Winter

Studying crops, from outer space

Planes chase satellite sightings of suspected debris

TECH SPACE
Chinese chemical plant protest turns violent

Peru orders Chinalco mining giant to stop waste-dumps

Clean cooking fuel and improved kitchen ventilation linked to less lung disease

Air pollution killed seven million people in 2012: WHO




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.