Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Industry and Business News .




AEROSPACE
DARPA Developing Next Generation Of Vertical Flight Technology
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Feb 26, 2013


While engineers have improved the speed of fixed-wing aircraft-achieving two and three times the speeds of jets designed since the 1960s, attempts to increase efficient VTOL aircraft speed have stalled.

One of the greatest challenges of the past half century for aerodynamics engineers has been how to increase the top speeds of aircraft that take off and land vertically without compromising the aircraft's lift to power in hover or its efficiency during long-range flight.

The versatility of helicopters and other vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft make them ideal for a host of military operations. Currently, only helicopters can maneuver in tight areas, land in unprepared areas, move in all directions, and hover in midair while holding a position.

This versatility often makes rotary-wing and other VTOL aircraft the right aerial platform for transporting troops, surveillance operations, special operations and search-and-rescue missions.

Compared to fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters are slower-leaving them more vulnerable to damage from enemy weapons. Special operations that rely on lightning-quick strikes and medical units that transport patients to care facilities need enhanced speed to shorten mission times, increase mission range, reduce the number of refueling events and, most important, reduce exposure to the adversary.

By their very design, rotary-wing aircraft that take off and land vertically have a disadvantage achieving speeds comparable to fixed-wing aircraft. Since its invention, engineers have attempted to overcome this design barrier but have encountered lower fuel efficiency and less lift capacity, controllability, simplicity, and reliability of design.

While engineers have improved the speed of fixed-wing aircraft-achieving two and three times the speeds of jets designed since the 1960s, attempts to increase efficient VTOL aircraft speed have stalled.

"For the past 50 years, we have seen jets go higher and faster while VTOL aircraft speeds have flat-lined and designs have become increasingly complex," said Ashish Bagai, DARPA program manager. "To overcome this problem, DARPA has launched the VTOL X-Plane program to challenge industry and innovative engineers to concurrently push the envelope in four areas: speed, hover efficiency, cruise efficiency and useful load capacity."

"We have not made this easy," he continued. "Strapping rockets onto the back of a helicopter is not the type of approach we're looking for. The engineering community is familiar with the numerous attempts in the past that have not worked.

"This time, rather than tweaking past designs, we are looking for true cross-pollinations of designs and technologies from the fixed-wing and rotary-wing worlds. The elegant confluence of these engineering design paradigms is where this program should find some interesting results."

A Proposers' Day will be held on March 14th. The Broad Agency Announcement for the solicitation can be found here.

.


Related Links
DARPA
Aerospace News at SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





AEROSPACE
F-35 flights should resume soon: Pentagon official
Sydney (AFP) Feb 25, 2013
The Pentagon's director of the F-35 programme said Monday the next-generation US fighter jet could be back in the air within a fortnight after an engine crack forced the grounding of test flights. Lieutenant General Christopher Bogdan, in Australia for talks on the jet, also dismissed any talk of foreign customers backing out of the costly project to build the F-35, known as the Joint Strike ... read more


AEROSPACE
Tokyo hotel shrinks in new-style urban demolition

Fluids in Space, Shaken Not Stirred

The world's most sensitive plasmon resonance sensor inspired by ancient Roman cup

Sustainable new catalysts fueled by a single proton

AEROSPACE
Boeing Receives USAF Contract for Integrated C4ISR Targeting Solution

Air Operations Center Modernization Program PDR Completed

Advanced Communications Waveforms Ported To Navy Digital Modular Radios

Astrium tapped for communications network

AEROSPACE
SpaceX 2 Launch Set for March 1

NASA Releases Glory Taurus XL Launch Failure Report Summary

India's 102nd space mission lifts off successfully

Countdown begins for Indo-French satellite launch

AEROSPACE
USAF Awards Lockheed Martin Contracts to Begin Work on Next Set of GPS III Satellites

Telit Offers COMBO 2G Chip For Multi Satellite Positioning Receiver

Boeing Awarded USAF Contract to Continue GPS Modernization

A system that improves the precision of GPS in cities by 90 percent

AEROSPACE
DARPA Developing Next Generation Of Vertical Flight Technology

EU MPs back temporary suspension of airline carbon tax

Embraer seeks larger executive jet market

F-35 flights should resume soon: Pentagon official

AEROSPACE
Rutgers physicists test highly flexible organic semiconductors

Quantum computers turn mechanical

Boeing Acquires CPU Tech's Microprocessor Business

Organic electronics: how to make contact between carbon compounds and metal

AEROSPACE
Northrop Grumman Delivers First Communications Payload for USAF's Enhanced Polar System

NASA Selects Launch Services for ICESat-2 Mission

New approach alters malaria maps

Promising New Technique for Probing Earth's Deep Interior

AEROSPACE
Sewage lagoons remove most - but not all - pharmaceuticals

Olympics: Illegal dump tarnishes 'green' Sochi Games

China admits pollution-linked 'cancer villages'

China considers BBQ ban to combat smog: state media




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement